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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
I suggested my plan of seizing the Saint Nicholas, and carrying out the scheme that had suggested itself to me at Colonel Sā€”ā€”'s. I was told that the Secretary (Mr. Mallory) would not agree to the plan, but that the Governor (Letcher) would. I then remarked that I would obtain Mr. Mallory's permission to apply to the Governor. I Mr. Mallory's permission to apply to the Governor. I walked into Mr. Mallory's room and asked his permission. He granted it, and I at once went straight to the Governor's. When I made my proposition, Governor Letcher, without a moments hesitation, acceded to the proposal, and gave me a draft for $1,000 to send North for arms and men, etc. He then and there introduced me to Colonel TMr. Mallory's room and asked his permission. He granted it, and I at once went straight to the Governor's. When I made my proposition, Governor Letcher, without a moments hesitation, acceded to the proposal, and gave me a draft for $1,000 to send North for arms and men, etc. He then and there introduced me to Colonel Thomas, of Maryland, alias Zarvona, as a person who could be trusted to go North to purchase arms, or transact other business. That same afternoon I started off for Point Lookout via Fredericksburg. After leaving Fredericksburg I met my two sons, who were on their way to Richmond; they joined me of course. That next evening we re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
e came to the plank road, and turned up towards Chancellorsville. I felt as if I was on holy ground; for it was right along here that we marched the 1st day of May, thirty-three years ago, led by Lee and Jackson, and A. P. Hill, and Heth, and Mallory. It is just about as warm and dusky now as then. We soon came to the road that we took to the left by The Furnace, but our time being limited, we conclude it is not sufficient to take the route we marched around Hooker's army; so we take the s swept by such a destructive artillery fire as can only be imagined. I don't believe the like was ever known before or since. The darkness and the fire combined render it impossible to execute the movement. The men drop on the ground. Colonel Mallory calls upon the officers to do their duty (the last words he ever spoke). My company, which was the right company of the regiment, was wheeled to the left and marched through the storm down to the color line. How beautifully the company resp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
crew in May, 1864. These were the first vessels ever injured in war by any system of electrical defences. In a long letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, to me after the war, he says: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-opercontemplated attack on Drewry's Bluff to which I referred in my first letter to you, and concerning which I quoted from the letter of the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, occurred in 1864, as clearly shown in my letter and in Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending James river to co-operate with General Butler in the attack on Drewry's Bluff, by causing the retirement of that fleet, undoubtedly saved Drewry's Bluff, the key to Richmond. How widely different in date and nature are the two circumstances, and yet you, of all persons, confuse them, and