Browsing named entities in Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for S. R. Mallory or search for S. R. Mallory in all documents.

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ed in session until the 21st, the following resolution was adopted: Whereas, the State of Florida has severed her connection with the late Federal Union, notice of that fact should be communicated to President Buchanan; Resolved, that Hons. S. R. Mallory, D. L. Yulee and George S. Hawkins, be and are hereby appointed commissioners for that purpose. It was also resolved, That this convention authorize and empower the governor of this State to employ the militia of this State, and such force organized. During these exciting events telegrams were received by Col. William H. Chase, whom the governor appointed major-general commanding State troops, and by A. E. Maxwell, R. C. Campbell and C. C. Jouge of Pensacola, from Senator S. R. Mallory, that a collision should be avoided; that Fort Pickens was not worth a drop of blood. Governor Perry, to co-operate with the troops from Alabama and other States, had ordered a force to Pensacola, consisting of two volunteer companies of infant
State forces except to make an assault; but the Florida senators in Washington and other representative men, including Senator Jefferson Davis, telegraphed advising that no blood should be shed. In the meantime the government at Washington was sending reinforcements to Forts Taylor and Jefferson, and on January 21st Capt. Israel Vogdes, with a company of artillerymen, was ordered to sail on the sloopof-war Brooklyn to reinforce Fort Pickens. On being informed of the latter overt act, Senator Mallory telegraphed to Mr. Slidell that it would doubtless provoke an attack upon the fort by the force of 1,700 men then assembled at the land defenses under Colonel Chase, and he urged that President Buchanan be informed that Fort Pickens would not be molested if reinforcements were not sent. Vogdes was then instructed not to land his men unless hostilities were begun. Thus the situation remained, with Vogdes' men on shipboard off Santa Rosa island, and the Alabama and Florida volunteers
he bore, and at the time of the accident was lying at anchor 25 miles above Apalachicola. On May 30th Commander John J. Guthrie was informed that nine Federal launches had come up the river and captured the schooner Fashion, loading with cotton, and he immediately ordered steam up to go to the assistance of the schooner. In a few moments the boilers of the gunboat exploded, sinking the vessel, killing 16 persons and severely scalding many others. Among those who lost their lives was Midshipman Mallory, who had distinguished himself by pushing his way first aboard the frigate Congress at Hampton Roads, after she had struck her colors to the Virginia. The guns of the Chattahoochee were taken off and mounted in battery on the shore, and reinforcements being sent down by General Cobb, then in command in that district, the enemy was prevented from taking advantage of the disaster. In a short time the gunboat was raised and repaired so that she was of service thereafter in defending the