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Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 42 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 10 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Malvern or search for Malvern in all documents.

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sessed Malvern Hills yesterday morning. They marched circuitously to the right, and approached in the rear of that position, having the enemy between them and the river. He may have been four thousand strong. The ball opened with artillery, both parties throwing spherical case; the enemy throwing more and making better practice than he usually does. His guns were numerous in proportion to his men. The duel began on Nelson's farm. Leaving that position, the enemy fell back two miles, to Malvern, and made a stand. Here the battle raged an hour, the gunboats participating; I do not think they were of any service, however. By an hour, the enemy was becoming silent. Soon after we advanced, not firing again. The bayonet was sufficient. The enemy did not stand an instant, nor fire a shot. He had already withdrawn his guns by the river-road toward Richmond. His cavalry followed them. His infantry scattered into a heavy body of woods, and, taking by-paths and cattle-ways, passed t