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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 4 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 2 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Manasses or search for Manasses in all documents.

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r former position. As the retreat led through a densely-wooded country, where cavalry could be of little use, only Fitz Lee's brigade joined our army in the pursuit-General Stuart pushing forward with Robertson's brigade to drive off the strong force of Federal cavalry which had been there brought together, and which would otherwise have operated successfully on our exposed flank. The 2d Virginia Cavalry, under the gallant Colonel Munford, was in the advance, and arrived at the plateau of Manasses before the two other regiments of the brigade had come up. Here they found the Yankee horse in far superior numbers, drawn up in two magnificent lines of battle, one behind the other. Without waiting for the arrival of their comrades, the brave fellows of the 2d, their intrepid Colonel at their head, threw themselves upon the foe. They succeeded in breaking the first line by their impetuous charge, but having been thrown into some disorder by the length of the attack, the second line of th