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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 93 5 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
vice of the State 104 companies, under the said act of the legislature, aggregating an effective force of 8,836 men and officers; that these companies had been formed into ten regiments and the regiments into four brigades. These regiments were mustered for twelve months service, were numbered respectively from 1 to 10, inclusive, and commanded by Cols. Johnson Hagood, J. B. Kershaw, J. H. Williams, J. B. E. Sloan, M. Jenkins, J. H. Rion, T. G. Bacon, E. B. Cash, J. D. Blanding, and A. M. Manigault. The brigadier-generals appointed by the governor under the act above referred to, were R. G. M. Dunovant and P. H. Nelson. By an act of the legislature, January 28, 1861 , the governor was authorized to raise a battalion of artillery and a regiment of infantry, both to be formed and enlisted in the service of the State as regulars, and to form the basis of the regular army of South Carolina. The governor appointed, under the act, R. S. Ripley, lieutenant-colonel in command of the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
made to erect forts or batteries in defense of the inlets of Worth or South Edisto, but the harbor of Georgetown was protected by works unfinished on Cat and South islands, for twenty guns, the heaviest of which were 32-pounders. When General Lee took command, November 8th, he established his headquarters at Coosawhatchie, and divided the line of defense into five military districts, from east to west, as follows: The First, from the North Carolina line to the South Santee, under Col. A. M. Manigault, Tenth volunteers, with headquarters at Georgetown; the Second, from the South Santee to the Stono, under Gen. R. S. Ripley, with headquarters at Charleston; the Third, from the Stono to the Ashepoo, under Gen. N. G. Evans, with headquarters at Adams' run; the Fourth, from Ashepoo to Port Royal entrance, under Gen. J. C. Pemberton, with headquarters at Coosawhatchie; the Fifth, the remainder of the line to the Savannah river, under Gen. T. F. Drayton, with headquarters at Hardeeville.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
Chapter 6: South Carolinians in the West Manigault's and Lythgoe's regiments at Corinth the Kentucky campaign battle of Murfreesboro. In April, 1862, following the battle of Shiloh, in response to the urgent call of General Beauregard, at Corinth, Miss., for troops to reinforce the army he then commanded, the Tenth South Carolina, Col. A. M. Manigault, and the Nineteenth, Col. A. J. Lythgoe, were ordered from the coast of South Carolina to report to that general. Arrived at Corinth, the two regiments were brigaded with the Twenty-fourth, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-fourth Alabama regiments, under the command of Brigadier-General Trapier, in the division of Major-General Withers. From December, 1862, the brigade was commanded by Colonel Manigault, and known as Manigault's brigade. Lieut.-Col. James F. Pressley took command of the Tenth. Covering the front of Beauregard's army, on May 2d, Manigault's brigade was brought into prominent notice by the firm stand it made
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
f Maj.-Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton commanded his brigade, including the First and Second South Carolina cavalry, and Capt. J. F. Hart's South Carolina battery was part of the horse artillery under Major Beckham. Thus it will be seen that there were two infantry brigades, five batteries, and two cavalry regiments of South Carolina troops in the army of General Lee on this march into Pennsylvania. Evans' and Gist's brigades were in Mississippi with General Johnston, and Manigault's brigade was with General Bragg's army at Chattanooga. Attached to those commands or serving in the West, were the batteries of Captains Ferguson, Culpeper, Waties and Macbeth. Most of the South Carolina troops of all arms were engaged in the defense of Charleston and the coast of the State, then being attacked by a powerful fleet and a Federal army. On June 7th the corps of Longstreet and Ewell, with the main body of the cavalry under Stuart, were encamped around Culpeper Court House
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
gained. The South Carolina brigades, Kershaw's, Manigault's and Gist's, were with the divisions of McLaws, Hto the left and took position in support of Hood. Manigault's brigade, including the Tenth and Nineteenth Soutat victory crowned its battle. In the left wing Manigault and Kershaw were in the thick of the fight. Kersh three brigades. Kershaw attacked about 11:30 and Manigault shortly after, the former in front of the Brock hoon's and half a mile beyond the Chattanooga road. Manigault reached a point on Kershaw's left and in line withhe front and east of Snodgrass, while Hindman with Manigault's and Deas' brigades, Johnson with Gregg's, and Pr had fallen. Kershaw lost 488 killed and wounded; Manigault 539, and the Twenty-fourth South Carolina (Gist'sant performance of duty. Capt. D. R. Huger of General Manigault's staff fell in front of Snodgrass hill, and oave and true officers of the same regiment. General Manigault mentioned the following as distinguished for c
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
and afford no particulars of the service of Manigault's brigade. Colonel Capers, reporting Septem on the east of the city, participated in by Manigault's brigade. Next day Hardee made a circuitou in the front line on the Federal flank, and Manigault's brigade, in another part of the field, challant Adjt. James O. Ferrell reported to General Manigault that all his captains were now wounded o Lieuts. G. A. Jennison and W. E. Huger, of Manigault's staff, were among the wounded. The brigad the divisions of Patton Anderson (including Manigault's brigade) and Stevenson in front, and Claytthe attacks, right and left, the brigades of Manigault and Gist were each in the line of support toely engaged and suffered only 4 casualties. Manigault had a more exciting experience. His brigadeist took command of Cheatham's division. In Manigault's brigade, of Edward Johnson's division, theThe Tenth and Nineteenth South Carolina, in Manigault's brigade, Edward Johnson's division, got in[5 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 21: (search)
ey and Captain Humbert, Second South Carolina artillery; Captain Mathewes and Lieutenant Boag, Manigault's battalion; Lieutenant-Colonel Yates, Major Blanding (severely wounded) and Captain King, Firle's. Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill, commanding Lee's corps, which included the South Carolinians of Manigault's brigade, reported the entire success of his command in the first attack, and added: Lieutenant-Colonel Carter [commanding Manigault's brigade] was in actual negotiation with a Yankee general for the surrender of his command. Unfortunately, at this juncture the enemy pressed upon the flank and rear of his advance, and many men were cut off. Captain Wood, adjutant-general of Manigault's brigade, brought out 10 men and 8 prisoners, after a tiresome march all night around the Yankee force Hill, also took part, and in the actions of March 8th, 9th and 10th, the South Carolinians of Manigault's brigade were engaged. Having fought to the extremity for a great Right, the army under Ge
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
lected to the legislature, and in 1879 was elected associate justice of the supreme court. In the latter office he won lasting honor and distinction as he had upon the field of battle. His death occurred in December, 1893. Brigadier-General Arthur Middleton Manigault Brigadier-General Arthur Middleton Manigault was born at Charleston in 1824. He was a great-grandson of Gabriel Manigault, a native of Charleston, and a famous merchant who was treasurer of the province in 1738; after the dBrigadier-General Arthur Middleton Manigault was born at Charleston in 1824. He was a great-grandson of Gabriel Manigault, a native of Charleston, and a famous merchant who was treasurer of the province in 1738; after the declaration of independence advanced $220,000 from his private fortune for war purposes, and in 1779, with his grandson Joseph, served as a private soldier in the defense of Charleston. General Manigault entered business life at Charleston in youth. In 1846 he went to the Mexican war as first lieutenant of a company of the Palmetto regiment, and served in the army of General Scott from Vera Cruz to the City of Mexico. Returning to Charleston he was in the commission business until 1856, and th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
, a Confederate surgeon and a member of Arthur M. Manigault camp, was born near Charleston, S. C. iry, commanded by Col. (afterward General) A. M. Manigault. He was detailed as first corporal of thouth Carolina infantry, commanded by Col. A. M. Manigault. At the time of the disbandment of this Elliott Huger, formerly of the staff of Gen. A. M. Manigault, was born at Charleston, January 8, 184 this plan by Capts. Lewis M. Hatch and Arthur M. Manigault, and firmly supported by Hon. A. G. Magrt of the brigade known afterward as Gen. A. M. Manigault's brigade, one of the finest in the army,listed in the Palmetto Guards, or Company A, Manigault's battalion, South Carolina siege train. Wi of the South Carolina siege train under Colonel Manigault in 1862, and served on John's island andTenth regiment. Under the colonelship of A. M. Manigault, he served in this command in South Carold his resignation. His regiment was part of Manigault's brigade, under General Bragg at Corinth af[4 more...]