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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 30: foreign Relations.—Unjust discrimination against us.—Diplomatic correspondence. (search)
Chapter 30: foreign Relations.—Unjust discrimination against us.—Diplomatic correspondence. Mr. Mason was appointed our Representative in London, Mr. Slidell in Paris, Mr. Rost in Spain, and Mr. Mann in Belgium. I hope Mr. Mann's memoirs, which are very full and written from diaries, will be published, and these will shed much light upon the diplomatic service of the Confederacy. The Confederate States having dissolved their connection with the United States, whose relations were secuMr. Mann's memoirs, which are very full and written from diaries, will be published, and these will shed much light upon the diplomatic service of the Confederacy. The Confederate States having dissolved their connection with the United States, whose relations were securely and long established with Foreign Governments, it devolved upon the Confederate States formally to declare to these Governments her separation from the United States. This the Provisional Congress did, but the United States antecedently had claimed sovereignty over the Confederate States, and the Governments of Europe announced that they could not assume to judge of the rights of the combatants. These Governments had fallen into the error, now commonly prevailing, that our separate sover
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 45: exchange of prisoners and Andersonville. (search)
e troops who were fighting in the front. The country in the rear was filled with soldiers broken up and scattered from their commands, who were having picnics. They were lying under trees, sleeping, cooking their coffee or other rations, and amusing themselves outside of the enemy's fire. This was by no means confined to the enlisted men, but I saw officers of various ranks, and men of high rank and of different corps and divisions, who had thus deserted their commands at the front. Dr. Mann, in the August Century, said in reference to the inmates of Andersonville: All classes and grades of society were represented within our prison. Negro soldiers; Bowery roughs, the worst class of all; mechanics, farmers, gamblers, etc. Until about August ist, there was absolutely no check to rascality of any kind, except our own individual physical strength a class of skulkers and gamblers, from both the Eastern and Western armies, captured in the rear by the rebel raiders. An
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 75: reasons for not asking Pardon.—Mississippi Valley Society. (search)
his return, these dear generous people very much desired to give him a tract of land and stock enough to furnish and cultivate it, but we felt unwilling to accept so much, and the gift was affectionately declined. He was engaged in a lawsuit to recover the Brierfield plantation, which had passed into other hands after the death of his brother, and hoped to live, even though the shrinkage in values would necessitate our living poorly, on the products of that plantation. While environed by these difficulties, Mr. Davis's health, which had been steadily declining, became worse, and he was ordered to take a long sea voyage. He sailed from New Orleans to Liverpool, and from there went to Paris to see his old friend, A. Dudley Mann, who was one of his dearest friends. He also saw his friends, Lord Campbell and Beresford Hope, with others who had been hospitable to him while temporarily a resident of England, and returned after three months time, much improved in health and strength.
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 78: the commencement and completion of the Rise and fall of the Confederate States of America.—the death of Jefferson Davis, Jr.—Honors Awarded by Mr. Davis's countrymen. (search)
as a matter of profit, and therefore must be satisfied if the end was gained of setting the righteous motives of the South before the world. As soon as The Rise and fall was completed we embarked at New Orleans, and went to Liverpool, and from there to meet our young daughter, who had left Germany for the advantage of a few months in Paris before quitting school. We remained three months in Paris, and during this time Mr. Davis spent the greater part of his time with his old friend, A. Dudley Mann, at Chantilly. Mr. Benjamin came to us there, older, but the same cheerful buoyant person, and that proved to be our last farewell to him. We returned home in November of the same year, and took up our abode at Beauvoir. The people of Alabama invited Mr. Davis to visit them the next year, and our daughter Varina, known as Winnie in the family, accompanied him. The enthusiasm with which he was received could not be described. All classes came to do him honor, and the journey was ext
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
by, and make commercial arrangements with, the leading governments there. These Commissioners were William L. Yancey, of Alabama; P. A. Rost<*> of Louisiana; A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia; and T. Butler King, of Georgia. Yancey was to operate in England, Rost in France, and Mann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a soMann in Holland and Belgium. King seems to have had a sort of roving commission. Yancey had more real ability and force of character than either of the others. He was not a statesman, but a demagogue, and lacked almost every requisite for a diplomatist. He could fill with wild passion an excitable populace at home, but he utterly failed to impress the more sober English mind with a was a Frenchman, who emigrated to Louisiana in early life, married a woman of fortune, and finally reached a seat on the bench of the Supreme Court of that State. Mann was a dull statistician of very moderate ability; and King was an extensive farmer and slaveholder. These men so fitly represented their bad cause in Europe, that
Confederate Commissioners. Hon.James M. MasonVirginiaCommissioner to Europe, especially to the Court of England; delegate from Virginia to the Provisional Congress. Hon.John SlidellLouisianaCommissioner to Europe, especially to the Court of France. Hon.William L. YanceyAlabamaCommissioner to Great Britain; Confederate Senator from Alabama, &c. Hon.A. Dudley MannVirginiaCommissioner to Beigium. Hon.P. A. RostLouisianaCommissioner to Spain. Hon.L. Q. C. LamarMississippiCommissioner to Russia. Major-General William PrestonKentuckyCommissioner to Mexico; Brigadier-General and Major-General in the Confederate army. Colonel John T. PickettKentuckyCommissioner to Mexico; Colonel in the Confederate army. Bishop P. N. Lynch, D. DSouth CarolinaCommissioner to the States of the Church. Hon.John ForsythAlabamaCommissioner to the United States of America. Hon.Martin J. CrawfordGeorgiaCommissioner to the United States of America; delegate to the Provisional Congress. Hon.A. B. R
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
nfederate States, especially in England and France, composed of the brilliant William L. Yancey and his associates, Mr. A. Dudley Mann, of Virginia, an accomplished diplomat, and Mr. Yost, of Louisiana. Further measures were enacted during Februar governments of Europe was made in March by the appointment of three commissioners, William L. Yancey, P. A. Yost and A. Dudley Mann, who went without delay to England. Afterward two other embassadors were appointed, James M. Mason and John Slidell,ent men among the foreign courts was made by sending Mr. Mason to England, Mr. Slidell to France, Mr. Yost to Spain, and Mr. Mann to Belgium. Mr. Yancey returned home and was elected to the Confederate Senate. These representatives of the Confedeudge Yost, a distinguished jurist from the same State, were all competent to discharge the duties assigned to them, Mr. A. Dudley Mann had gained extensive diplomatic experience in negotiation of treaties with the German states, and as special commis
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
H. Reagan lives, and is a member of the National Legislature. Of the commissioners who represented the Confederacy abroad, James M. Mason and William L. Yancey, accredited to Great Britain, John Slidell, accredited to France, P. A. Rost, accredited to Spain, John T. Pickett, accredited to Mexico, Bishop Lynch, accredited to the States of the Church, and John Forsyth, Martin J. Crawford, A. B. Roman, and Charles J. Faulkner, accredited to the United States, are dead. The octogenarian, A. Dudley Mann, accredited to Belgium, resides in France. The Honorable Lucius Q. C. Lamar, accredited to Russia, is a member of President Cleveland's Cabinet, and General William Preston, accredited to Mexico, rejoices in his broad acres in the blue-grass region of Kentucky. Among the Consular, Confidential and Foreign Agents of the Confederacy we note the demise of C. C. Clay, Jacob Thompson, James P. Holcombe, Charles J. Helm, Colin J. McRae, George N. Sanders, J. L. O'Sullivan, and of others h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
8, 19. McNairy, Col., 78. McRae, Hon. C. J., 274. McIntosh's Battery, 394. Madison, President, James, 254. Madrid Bend, 95. Madrid, New, 70. Magruder, Gen. John B., 93, 98 Malone, P J., 224. Mallory, Hon. L. R., 275. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 19, 429. Manassas, Battle of, 257, 282; second, 19, 21. Manassas Junction, 93. Manderson, Gen., 349. Maney, Gen. Geo., 315, 372. Mangum, Hon. L. H., 365. Manigault, Gen. A. M., 31, 396. Manigault, Major, Edward, 130. Mann, Hon., A. Dudley, 273 Manning, Capt. J. H., 91. Manning, W. H.,396. Marginalia, cited, 28. Marigny, Col. M., 448. Marion, 65. Marion, Gen., Francis, 9, 12, 177. Marion Rifles, 134. Mark, Col., 71, 72, 73, 76. Markoe, Jr., Capt. F., 92, 103 Markoe, John, 127. Marlborough, Duke of, 112, 341. Marshall, Capt. A. W., 416. Marshall, Col. Chas., 264, 296. Marshall, Col., J. Foster, 130. Martin, 104. Martin, Capt., 11. Martin, Col., 300, 310. Martin, Gen. J. G., 268 Martin, Lt.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The siege and evacuation of Savannah, Georgia, in December, 1864. (search)
th, 1890. By Col. Charles C. Jones, Jr., Ll.D., President of the Association. By the necrological record of each recurring year are we reminded, my comrades, that the mortality among those who were actively engaged in the military and civil service of the Confederacy is augmenting in a rapidly increasing ratio. We had scarcely departed from this hall, a twelve month ago, when we were apprised of the death near Paris, France, in absolute retirement and at a very advanced age, of the Hon. A. Dudley Mann, who, during the war, was entrusted with an important diplomatic mission. On the 31st of last May, S. P. Moore, Surgeon-General of the Con federate States, was overtaken by that gaunt foe whose grim advances in camp, in hospital, and in bloody battle he had, during more than four years of exposure, privation and carnage, essayed to check. On the 20th of the following month, Colonel A. C. Myers, first quartermaster-general of the Confederacy, passed quietly away; and on the 25t
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