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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 148 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 78 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 40 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. 38 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 34 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Horace Mann or search for Horace Mann in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
April 30, 1846, and with whom he continued to exchange notes and courtesies; Horace Mann's labors in behalf of popular education; the literary success of his friendsding his recklessness in keeping late hours, Sumner's health was excellent. Horace Mann wrote of him to Howe in 1852, what was true of him always: He yields obedienng revision, he was always discovering a construction or a word to improve. Horace Mann wrote to a young man in whom he had been interested as a boy,—George E. Bakeon against his severe canons of criticism. He cut to pieces a lecture which Horace Mann sent him for revision, and an impartial and competent journalist who happenee it covered with his pencil marks says that every change was an improvement. Mr. Mann wrote with power and eloquence, but there was a want of chasteness and finish am and John Jay on measures against war and slavery; with Giddings, Palfrey, and Mann on issues in Congress and the antislavery movement; He was also in familiar r
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 31: the prison—discipline debates in Tremont Temple.—1846-1847. (search)
had pushed into the lists like the unrecognized Richard on the field of arms at Ashby. Four members of the committee—Sumner, Howe, Eliot, and Dwight—inspected the Philadelphia prison on two successive days in October, Two other members, Horace Mann and Dr. Walter Channing, made their visits some weeks later. and on the third day, which was Sunday, attended the religious exercises, which were conducted in one division by Miss D. L. Dix, and in another by Mr. Dwight. Naturally enough, the was renewed at the anniversary meeting of the Society in May, 1846. Eliot, Dwight, Dr. W. Channing, and Bigelow concurred in a report drawn by Dr. Channing, which sustained the course of the Society and its secretary; while Dr. Howe, Sumner, and Mann joined in a minority report drawn by Dr. Howe. Sumner assisted in correcting the proofs. Sumner made ineffectual efforts at business meetings of the Society to have both reports printed with the annual report for 1846, but was defeated by the p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
ich questions concerning slavery were to be considered. Horace Mann thought him fair in this respect; Letter to Sumner, Jan. 9, 1850. Mann's view of Winthrop later was less favorable. Mann's Life, pp. 283-286, 289, 310. and though not considerMann's Life, pp. 283-286, 289, 310. and though not considering him as satisfactory as he could wish, voted for him in 1849; and Dr. Bailey of the National Era, Jan. 3, 1850. who on the spot kept a sharp eye on such matters, concurred in Mr. Mann's view as to one committee, but thought otherwise as to tn a Whig who had made opposition to slavery paramount, like Mann; and while it was right for Palfrey to question him, it wasnts at Washington were Palfrey, from December, 1847, and Horace Mann, who took J. Q. Adams's seat early in 1848. He had requested Mann to undertake the defence of Drayton and Sayres, indicted in the District of Columbia for the abduction of slaves, and assisted him with points and authorities Mann's Life, pp. 260, 265, 269-272. Sumner wrote to his brother George
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
New York Tribune, September 29. After entering Congress in March, 1848, Horace Mann retained, by advice of the friends of popular education, his office of Secreontests which would interfere with his usefulness in the office of secretary. Mann's Life, pp. 264-265. Sumner, in person and in several letters, urged him to declnst Taylor's nomination, and to take his place openly with the Free Soilers; but Mann, while generally heedful of Sumner's opinions, did not see his duty in that lighding his silence on the question of candidate for President. Sumner again plied Mann in 1849 with earnest entreaties to take his stand openly with the Free Soilers. A year later Mann took his place with the Free Soilers. He wrote Sept. 20, 1849:— I have sent you our State Address, A Free Soil State Address, drawn by Sree Soil principles. On the other hand, Free Soilers in Massachusetts supported Mann for Congress, although he was at the time a voter and candidate of the Whig part
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 34: the compromise of 1850.—Mr. Webster. (search)
rote Sumner, July 5, 1850, that General Taylor had been growing more and more Northern in sentiment, and had become a most formidable obstacle to a compromise. Horace Mann took the same view of Taylor. (Mann's Life, pp. 305, 307, 322.) But in the end the General's negative policy would have fallen between the positive forces arraMann's Life, pp. 305, 307, 322.) But in the end the General's negative policy would have fallen between the positive forces arrayed against each other. See Boston Republican, June 27, 1850. California being entitled by all precedents to admission without an offset, Clay's Compromise measures, except the one last named, were all in the interest of slavery. They were (1) the Texas boundary bill, granting that State ten millions of dollars for territory whid by Webster and other supporters of the Compromise that a revision of the tariff in their interest could be obtained only by concession to Southern demands. Horace Mann's Life, pp. 331, 332, 335, 337. Webster's Private Correspondence. vol. II. pp. 366, 370, 388, 390, 391; Webster's Works, vol. VI. p. 547. Von Holst, vol. III
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
meetings in Cambridge during addresses from Horace Mann and Ralph Waldo Emerson. Longfellow's Liprinciples a matter of bargain and sale. Horace Mann, in two Letters, May 3 and June 6 (Notes, Jnd following him closely in his misstatements. Mann's argument was one of great ability, but impairies. During the summer his correspondence with Mann was constant. The controversy between the Websy bitter. Webster's Latinity—his comparison of Mann to the captatores verborum, a set of small but rk, by skill, determination, will, backbone. Mann's loss of a renomination to Congress in the Whife, pp. 303, 324. Some Whigs, like Rockwell and Mann, both of Massachusetts, who had Free Soil sympa the seat, he would turn the tables upon them. Mann's Life, p. 330.—an influence, however, which died his approval of the unions with the Whigs on Mann and Fowler as candidates for Congress, and withuincy Adams as President by Clay's help, Horace Mann, referring to the charges against Adams and[19 more...]<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
the slaveholding population; and their trial, in which they were defended by Horace Mann, excited general interest Ante, p. 156. They received a heavy sentence in f Mr. Webster, who happened to come in early in the speech, remained an hour; Mann's Life, p. 381. and as far as known it was his last visit to the Senate. It wounstrained to yield it support under a sense of constitutional obligation. Horace Mann, in his speech in Congress, Feb. 28, 1851, treated at length this unconstitu, which Sumner had not the time to enter upon, were ably discussed by others,—by Mann in the speech above referred to and in his speech at Lancaster, Mass., May 19, 1d it, bore, after reading it, his second testimony to its convincing power. Horace Mann wrote, the day after it was delivered, to Mrs. Mann, that it would tell on tMrs. Mann, that it would tell on the country, and be a speech for a book and for history. John Bigelow, of the New York Evening Post, who, though a faithful friend of Sumner, looked at antislavery s
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 37: the national election of 1852.—the Massachusetts constitutional convention.—final defeat of the coalition.— 1852-1853. (search)
occupied the chair, Adams reported the resolutions, and Horace Mann was nominated for governor. Among the speakers were Wilson, Mann, and Burlingame. On the platform, in a conspicuous seat, was Captain Drayton, the liberated master of the Pearl. ity, and with it the State offices and senator, although Horace Mann as candidate for governor received nine thousand more voantislavery. Controversy between Wendell Phillips and Horace Mann on the voting question. If Phillips, whom I love as an eorators of the State,—Palfrey the president, Sumner, Adams, Mann, Wilson, Burlingame, Dana, Keyes, Leavitt, Pierpont, and Ga were radically antislavery, and the names of Sumner and Horace Mann were suggested to them. They preferred the former, as mve, and deals with his cases strongly. I do not agree with Mann in his admiration of his powers; nor do I agree with the la ballot nearly all the votes as candidate for governor. Horace Mann, on his way to Ohio, where he was to be the President of
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 39: the debate on Toucey's bill.—vindication of the antislavery enterprise.—first visit to the West.—defence of foreign-born citizens.—1854-1855. (search)
hose of Connecticut and Vermont. In my speech the other night you will find these laws briefly vindicated. I am glad you have your hand on this work. Now is the day and now is the hour. The free States must be put in battle array, from which they will never retreat. I know you will do your part of the work. Late in May Sumner left Boston on a journey to the West, his first visit to a section of the country which he had greatly desired to see. At Yellow Springs, Ohio, he called on Horace Mann, then president of Antioch College. At Cincinnati he was glad to meet Chase, then preparing for the State election, in which he was to be the Republican candidate for governor. The two friends drove to the beautiful suburbs and to the cemetery at Clifton, destined to be the last resting-place of one of them. At Lexington, Ky., Sumner visited the home and grave of Henry Clay. He was Cassius M. Clay's guest at White Hall, in Madison County, in company with whom he examined the former's
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
Oct. 14, 1858; Prescott, Jan. 28, 1859; His last letter from Sumner was written from Aix-les-Bains, Sept. 15, 1858. Horace Mann, Aug. 2, 1859; Tributes to Mr. Mann may be found in Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 424; vol. v. p. 288. Dr. G. BaileMr. Mann may be found in Sumner's Works, vol. IV. p. 424; vol. v. p. 288. Dr. G. Bailey of the National Era, June 5, 1859; Sumner expected to meet Dr. Bailey in Paris, but he died at sea on his way to Europe. and Tocqueville, April 16, 1859. Theodore Parker died in Florence a few months later, May 10, 1860. Sumner wrote to Parker, Aug. 22, 1859:— You will mourn Horace Mann. He has done much; but I wish he had lived to enjoy the fruits of his noble toils. He never should have left Massachusetts. His last years would have been happier and more influential had he stay at home. His portrait ought to be in every public school in the State, and his statue in the State House. A statue of Mann, to which Sumner contributed, was unveiled in front of the State House, July 4, 1865. The aesthetic development of the peo
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