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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 3 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Van H. Manning or search for Van H. Manning in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 4 document sections:

ned, and often without arms. From the Confederate secretary of war authority was received for the raising of regiments for the Confederate service. Hundreds of applications to him for this service were declined for want of arms. Many leaders went to Montgomery and Richmond for authority to organize military commands, and returned without it. Some even marched their commands to the field inefficiently armed, and these importuned the war department for commissions. Hindman, Cleburne and Van Manning used extraordinary means to obtain arms for their men. The volunteers, recruited in all parts of the State, began to arrive at the capital. The arsenal grounds were one large encampment. Many companies assembled for organization with their fowling pieces, deer guns and squirrel rifles. The one great drawback to the equipment of an army was the want of efficient arms, and yet, of the 60,000 electors in the State, 25,000 were enrolled the first year and transported to the fields of batt
, four companies of Arkansans under Capt. P. H. Wheat, assisted by several independent companies of conscripts, and defeated with a loss of 55 killed and captured. In the latter part of May, Van Dorn had ordered Brigadier-General Rust to report to Hindman. General Rust represented the southern district of Arkansas in Congress at the time of the secession of the State, and raised the Third Arkansas infantry, which he commanded in Virginia, until he let the command devolve upon Lieutenant-Colonel Van Manning, a most meritorious officer, and coming to Arkansas, had been promoted to brigadiergeneral by President Davis, put in command of unattached forces by Van Dorn, and given a brigade in the army of the West. Though a man of great energy in business, and of gigantic stature, he lacked aptitude for commanding or inspiring men in military operations. Under General Hindman, he commanded the cavalry, led that arm in the first operations against Curtis, and now, Hindman having heard on
the organization the officers chosen were, Col. Albert Rust, Lieut.-Col. Seth M. Barton, Maj. Van H. Manning, Adjt. Henry A. Butler, Surgeon Joseph Brown, of Union county. Company A, Capt. W. H. Tebon Wilkins, of Ashley county. Colonels Rust and Barton being promoted to brigadier-generals, Major Manning became colonel, Capt. R S. Taylor became lieutenantcol-onel, and Capt. W. Wilkins major, subparticipated in the battle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg September 17, 1862, where Colonel Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg it was assigned to Hood's Texas brigade, commandeeral miles that morning to save the Confederate line. In the engagement that day, its colonel, Manning, was shot through the thigh, and being captured was detained a prisoner of war until three monta, after the latter had repulsed the Fourth and Fifth Texas, which were smaller regiments. Colonel Manning, after being discharged from prison, settled in Mississippi, married, and upon the overthro
rming Thomas for the safety of his position. McNair's brigade advanced, on the right of Johnson's line, against the Federal center, a little before noon. The Arkansans were in the front line, supported by General Hood, in whose line was Col. Van H. Manning's Third Arkansas, from the army of Northern Virginia. The enemy was swept back to his breastworks and through them. Moving on irresistibly, McNair's brigade charged a hill near Dyer's house. About this time General McNair and Colonel Ha415; the Second rifles, 52 out of 139; the Twenty-fifth, 61 out of 133. General Robertson, commanding Hood's brigade, reported among his killed Lieutenant Worthington, Third Arkansas. This regiment shared fully in the battle, and suffered, said Manning, accustomed to the casualties in Virginia, a remarkably large loss. Calvert's battery, Lieut. T. J. Key, fought effectively with Polk's brigade; Humphreys' battery, with Stewart's division; and Wiggins' battery was with Wheeler in the raid thro