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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 8 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 8 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John L. Manning or search for John L. Manning in all documents.

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the Hampton Legion into action, which he executed in a style unsurpassed and unsurpassable. Gen. Beauregard rode up and down our lines between the enemy and his own men, regardless of the heavy fire, cheering and encouraging our troops. About this time a shell struck his horse, taking its head off, and killing the horses of his aids, Messrs. Ferguson and Hayward. Gen. Beauregard's aids deserve honorable mention, particularly those just named, and Cols. W. Porcher Miles, James Chesnut, John L. Manning, and A. R. Chisolm. Gen. Johnston also threw himself into the thickest of the fight, seizing the colors of a Georgia regiment, and rallying them to the charge. His staff signalized themselves by their intrepidity, Col. Thomas being killed and Major Mason wounded. Your correspondent heard Gen. Johnston exclaim to Gen. Cocke just at the critical moment, Oh, for four regiments! His wish was answered, for in the distance our reinforcements appeared. The tide of battle was turned in ou
olumn will show how little support, truthful, exact, and candid as he is, he is likely to receive there, even from those who might be supposed above the madness of a mob. He had stated that at New Orleans British subjects had been forcibly impressed into the ranks of so-called volunteers. On their resistance he said that they had been knocked down and dragged off, and only released after energetic representations by the British Consul to the authorities. When we find it admitted by Colonel Manning, aide-de-camp to the Governor of the State of Louisiana, that there do exist at New Orleans volunteer corps called the Carroll Guards, which he admits to be without any recognized military organization, to be so far beyond the control of the authorities, and for whom, therefore, he wisely declines to be responsible, our readers will easily understand how British subjects, in common with other people at New Orleans, would be liable to great outrage, notwithstanding earnest wishes to the
ve our wounded from the hospital, which had become the special target of the enemy's rifle guns, notwithstanding it was surmounted by the usual yellow hospital flag, but which, however, I hope, for the sake of past associations, was ignorantly mistaken for a Confederate flag. The name of each individual medical officer I cannot mention. On the day of the engagement, I was attended by my personal staff, Lieutenant S. W. Ferguson, A. D.C., and my volunteer aides-de-camp, Colonels Preston, Manning, Chestnut, Miles, Chisholm, and Heyward, of South Carolina, to all of whom I am greatly indebted for manifold essential services in the transmission of orders on the field, and in the preliminary arrangements for occupation and maintenance of the line of Bull Run. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General; Capt. C. N. Smith, Assistant Adjutant-General; Col. S. Jones, Chief of Artillery and Ordnance; Major Cabell, Chief Quarter-master; Capt. W. H. Fowle, Chief of Subsistence Departme