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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 10 0 Browse Search
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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 2: early political action and military training. (search)
ted the blackened ruins to be left standing as they were, refusing all offers of purchase of the site; and it was first encroached upon under the right of eminent domain by taking part of it for a street. All in vain were the efforts of the officers of justice of the county of Middlesex to bring to justice the offenders who committed this monstrous arson. John R. Buzzell, a brickmaker, who led the riot, and who confessed that he had done so, was tried and acquitted. A boy of seventeen, Marvin Marcy Jr., who had been drawn into the affair purely for love of mischief, was alone convicted, and he was set at liberty at the expiration of seven months. Arson in the night-time was then punishable by death. No man doubts that there never was a more outrageous transaction, or one more disgraceful to a Massachusetts community, or one that caused a greater libel upon its justice. At that time the laws of Massachusetts contained no provision which made the town or community pecuniarily resp
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
t, trusting to time to elucidate the question. In the latter part of 1866, while I was in Europe, General Grant, through one of his staff, communicated with General Marcy in regard to papers missing from the files of the office of general-in-chief during my tenure of the place. In searching my papers, General Marcy GeneralGeneral Marcy General Marcy was McClellan's chief-of-staff and also his father-in-law. found my retained copy of the despatch of March 2 from Halleck in which he reports Grant's unauthorized absence, etc. This he forwarded to General Grant, who was thus for the first time informed of the truth. This despatch and my reply had, with many others, disappeGeneral Marcy was McClellan's chief-of-staff and also his father-in-law. found my retained copy of the despatch of March 2 from Halleck in which he reports Grant's unauthorized absence, etc. This he forwarded to General Grant, who was thus for the first time informed of the truth. This despatch and my reply had, with many others, disappeared from the files in the office. So with regard to my correspondence as general-in-chief. The military-telegraph office was first established by me, and was located, as already stated, in the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac. . . . Some one abstracted the telegrams above alluded to. As to Halleck's conduct with rega
e of the war, 879; merit for leadership recognized by Lee, 879-880; an open letter from Horace Lacy to, 881-887. Major Archer's corps of reserves, reference 679. Malden, Mass., the arson case in, 1029-1030. Mallory, Colonel, slaves of, come to Butler, 256-257. Malvern, the flag-ship at Fort Fisher, 791, 796, 797. Manassas Junction, Butler advises fortifying, 222-223. Manchac pass, capture of, 501. Mansfield, General, commanding at Washington, mention of, 225, 236. Marcy, General, forwards copy of missing despatches to Grant, 874. Marengo, Napoleon's famous battle, 864-865. Marston, General, ordered to furnish vegetables to prisoners, 613. Martindale, General, reference to, 690; letter in regard to, 694. Martin, Capt., Frederick, Drury's Bluff, 891-892; on Butler's staff, 899. Marine Bank, failure of, 860. Marshall, John, Chief Justice U. S. Supreme Court, reference to, 64. Massachusetts, Butler aspires to be governor of, 967-968; elected, 96