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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
s, or through the deep estuaries of Eastern Virginia. One day, I think it was the 20th of December, General McClellan, ordinarily so assiduous, did not appear at headquarters. The next day it was learned that he was ill. Three days later his life was in danger. Exhausted with work, his robust physique was seized with a typhoid of the most serious type. . . . His absence paralyzed work at headquarters. He had not regularly delegated his powers. His father-in-law and chief of staff, General Marcy, did not dare to act definitively in his name. McClellan had made the mistake of not creating a general field-staff service, with a duly appointed chief of staff. This might have aided him in securing a consistent ensemble of military operations . . . . On his return to the duties of his office [January 13], he realized that during his absence important changes had been arranged. On the 15th of January, Mr. Cameron was superseded by Mr. Stanton, a celebrated lawyer, who was spoken of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
homas, then Adjutant-General of the Army. General McClellan says [see above]: all the Corps commanders on the south side were on the 26th directed to be prepared to send as many troops as they could spare in support of Porter on the next day. All of them thought the enemy so strong in their respective fronts as to require all their force to hold their positions. upon the demand for troops General Heintzelman replied as follows: headquarters Third Corps, 4 P. M., June 26, 1862. General Marcy, chief of staff: I think I can hold the intrenchments with four brigades for twenty-four hours; that would leave two (2) brigades available for service on the other side of the river, but the men are so tired and worn out that I fear they would not be in a condition to fight after making a march of any distance. . . S. P. Heintzelman, Brigadier-General. this is far from being a statement that all his forces were required to hold his own lines. General McClellan says [see p.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The rear-guard at Malvern Hill. (search)
tance all the cavalry that can be raised here. It is of the utmost importance that we should save all our artillery, and as many of our wagons as possible; and the commanding general feels the utmost confidence that you will do all that can be done to accomplish this. Permit me to say that if you bring in everything you will accomplish a most signal and meritorious exploit, which the commanding general will not fail to represent in its proper light to the Department. Very respectfully, R. B. Marcy, Chief of Staff. July 2d. Brigadier-General Keyes. General McClellan came out half a mile and met me. I was engaged sending forward sheaves of wheat to fill the ruts in the road near camp, which were so deep that in spite of all efforts to fill them, about 1200 wagons were parked for the night under guard outside. The general appeared well satisfied with what had been done by the rear-guard, and after all the proofs cited above, it is scarcely probable that he made a mistake in the n
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Administration in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
more fully from Harrison's Landing, then saying that reenforcements should be sent to me rather much over, than much less, than 100,000 men. He referred to his memorandum of the 20th of August, 1861. That memorandum called for 273,000 men. General Marcy, his chief-of-staff, who bore this dispatch to Washington, telegraphed back: I have seen the President and Secretary of War. 10,000 men from Hunter, 10,000 from Burnside, and 11,000 from here have been ordered to reinforce you as soon as ates offer me a new levy of 300,000, which I accept. On the 5th, Mr. Stanton wrote that he had nominated all the corps commanders for promotion. The gallantry of every officer and man in your noble army shall be suitably acknowledged. General Marcy will take you cheering news. Be assured that you shall have the support of this Department and the Government as cordially and faithfully as ever was rendered by man to man, and if we should ever live to see each other face to face, you will
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
, and in full readiness for active field duty. --Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, page 65. Provisions, stores, ammunition, and clothing, were on hand in the greatest abundance, and the chief commander was furnished with numerous and efficient staff officers, The following officers composed the staff of General McClellan soon after taking the command of the Army of the Potomac: Major S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain Albert V. Colburn, Assistant Adjutant-General; Colonel R. B. Marcy, Inspector-General; Colonel T. M. Key, Aid-de-Camp; Captain 3N. B. Sweitser, 1st Cavalry, Aid-de-Camp; Captain Edward McK. Hudson, 14th Infantry, Aid-de-Camp; Captain L A. Williams, 10th Infantry, Aid-de-Camp; Major A. J. Myer, Signal Officer; Major Stewart Van Vliet, Chief Quartermaster; Captain H. F. Clarke, Chief Commissary; Surgeon C. S. Tripler, Medical Director; Major J. G. Barnard, Chief Engineer; Major J. N. Macomb, Chief Topographical Engineer; Captain Charles P. Kingsbury,
proud of our wise and brave young Major-General. There is a future before him, if his life be spared, which he will make illustrious. He is the son-in-law of Major Marcy, of the United States army. In conversation with Major Marcy about his Red River exploration some years ago, he pleasantly remarked that then McClellan was a lMajor Marcy about his Red River exploration some years ago, he pleasantly remarked that then McClellan was a lieutenant under him, but now he (Marcy) was under McClellan. P. S.--The news reached the camp to-night that Gen. Garnett is killed. He was followed into the mountains by Gen. Hill. He lost one cannon, several men killed, and several men taken prisoners. I am informed that the Seventh and Ninth Indiana Regiments, Cols. Dumont Marcy) was under McClellan. P. S.--The news reached the camp to-night that Gen. Garnett is killed. He was followed into the mountains by Gen. Hill. He lost one cannon, several men killed, and several men taken prisoners. I am informed that the Seventh and Ninth Indiana Regiments, Cols. Dumont and Milroy, Fourteenth Ohio, Col. Steadman, and First Artillery, Ohio, Col. Barnett, were engaged in this work of routing the rebels in the mountains. I go up to Beverly to-day and shall learn all the particulars. --N. Y. Times, July 20th. Cinoinnati Gazette narrative. To understand the exact location of the battle
ume command of the Army of the Potomac, comprising the troops serving in the former departments of Washington and Northeastern Virginia, in the Valley of the Shenandoah, and in the States of Maryland and Delaware. The organization of the command into divisions and brigades will be announced hereafter. The following-named officers are attached to the staff of the Army of the Potomac: Major S. Williams, assistant adjutant-general; Captain Alex. V. Colburn, assistant adjutant-general; Col. R. B. Marcy, inspector-general; Col. T. M. Key, aide-de-camp; Capt. N. B. Swetzer, First Cavalry, aide-de-camp; Captain Edward McK. Hudson, Fourteenth infantry, aide-de-camp; Captain L. A. Williams, Tenth infantry, aide-de-camp; Major A. J. Myers, signal officer; Major Stewart Van Vleit, chief quartermaster; Captain H. F. Clarke, chief commissary; Surgeon C. S. Tripler, medical director; Major J. G. Barnard, chief engineer; Major J. M. Macomb, chief topographical engineer; Captain Charles P. Kingsb
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
the first place, I do not want any charge of the money. In the second place, Mr. Stanton, to be honest with you, my orders cannot be countermanded after I get to sea, for I am going to take New Orleans or you will never see me again. Well, said he in the presence of Mr. Lincoln, you take New Orleans and you shall be lieutenant-general. I bowed and left. I stayed in Washington long enough to have a little bird sing to me that General McClellan's father-in-law and chief of staff, R. B. Marcy, had said: I guess we have found a hole to bury this Yankee elephant in. The night of the 24th of February I left for Baltimore to go to Fortress Monroe, and at nine o'clock on the evening of the 25th I stood on the deck of the good steamer Mississippi with my wife and some of my staff officers beside me, and gave orders to up anchor for Ship Island. I had sixteen hundred men on board with me, and the enormous sum of seventy-five dollars in gold in my pocket with which to pay the expe
Doc. 92.-battle of Fair Oaks, Va. General Heintzelman's report. see page 72 documents, ante. headquarters Third corps, Savage's Station, June 7, 1862. General R. B. Marcy, Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac, New-Bridge: General: I have the honor to report the operations of the Third and Fourth army corps, under my command during the engagements of the thirty-first of May and first of June. On the twenty-fifth of May, Gen. Keyes's corps was placed under my command. He was dy discreet, prompt and satisfactory manner in which you and the small party under your command performed the important duty assigned to you by Colonel Averell, of communicating with the commander of the gunboats on the James River. (Signed) R. B. Marcy, Chief of Staff. Lieutenant Davis and Sergeant Vandergrift, with the command of ten picked men, started on Sunday morning, and proceeded in the direction of the James River, to reach the point opposite City Point. After proceeding about f
nks in a letter to the Lieutenant and his command. It runs thus: headquarters army of Potomac, May 27, 1862. Lieut. Davis, Third Pennsylvania Cavalry: Sir: I am instructed by the Major-General Commanding, to express to you his thanks for the very discreet, prompt and satisfactory manner in which you and the small party under your command performed the important duty assigned to you by Colonel Averell, of communicating with the commander of the gunboats on the James River. (Signed) R. B. Marcy, Chief of Staff. Lieutenant Davis and Sergeant Vandergrift, with the command of ten picked men, started on Sunday morning, and proceeded in the direction of the James River, to reach the point opposite City Point. After proceeding about four miles, he learned that six of the enemy's pickets were posted in the woods near by. He avoided these, and about one mile further on came across a negro, who stated that about three hundred yards further on were twelve mounted rebel pickets at a h
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