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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
Monumenta Germanica in Germany, launched in 1823, and the Documents Inedits in France, begun in 1835. The desire to do something similar for the United States led Peter Force to attempt his American Archives, which was authorized by an act of Congress passed 2 March, 1833. It was published at a large profit to the compilers and smacked so much of jobbery that great dissatisfaction was created in Congress and among the executive officers. The result was that it was discontinued by Secretary of State Marcy in 1855 when only nine volumes had been published. Force's materials were badly arranged and his editorial notes were nearly nil, but his ideal was good. Had it been carried out with a fairer regard for economy it might have escaped the rock on which it foundered. As it was, it served to call attention to a field in which much needed to be done, and it is probable that the collections of documents undertaken about that time in the states owed their inception in a considerable mea
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ace, 404, 408, 409, 410 Manners, J. Hartley, 295 Mansfield, Richard, 278, 280, 283 Mansions of England, the, 100 Man's woman, a, 93 Man's World, a, 295 Man that Corrupted Hadleyburg, the, 14 Manual of political economy (Cooper, T.), 433 Manual of political economy, a (Smith, E. P.), 436 Manuscript found, 520 Man who Owns Broadway, the, 289 Man without a country, the, 120, 349 Marble Faun, The, 489, 489 n. March, F. A., 479, 480-81 Marching through Georgia, 497 Marcy, 175 Mardi and a voyage thither, 56 Margaret Fleming, 285 Margery's lovers, 273 Margin of profits, the, 440 Marion Darche, 88 Market-place, the, 92 Markham, Edwin, 312 Markham, Sir, Clements, 626 Marks, Josephine Preston Peabody, 291 Mark Twain. See Clemens, Samuel Langhorne Marlowe, Christopher, 126 Marlowe, Julia, 279, 283 Marlowe, 291 Marquis, Don, 22 Marriage of Guenevere, the, 51 Marsh, George Perkins, 473 Marsh, James, 228 Marshall (Discoverer
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
ted the sectional question from party politics. In both of these conventions there were delegates who had shown great hostility to slavery. Some were in the Democratic convention who had earnestly supported Van Buren in 1848 against the nominee of their party. Others had been extremists in their antagonism to the settlement of 1850. But the hitherto contestants were now marshaling again into old party affiliations to renew party contests without the obstruction of sectional questions. Marcy men and Wright men harmonized. In the Whig convention were many men who, being opposed to the compromise measures, united in presenting the name of General Winfield Scott, of Virginia, to the convention as their favorite for the presidency. Scott had himself opposed the settlement and was still regarded as being among the dissatisfied members. He was, however, a Southerner, a Whig, an illustrious soldier, and popular in the Northern States. A class of conservatives led by the Massachuset
py the city. Held it till retaken by the Federals in December, when our small force successfully evacuated it under the fire of the enemy's gunboats, and before the advance of their infantry, which had landed. The battery remained at Port Hudson, participating in all the operations of the forces there till May 1, 1863, when it was ordered to Williams's Bridge to intercept Grierson's raid, arriving there a few hours after the raid had passed. May 7. Ordered to Jackson, Mississippi, with Marcy's Brigade. Participated in the Big Black campaign of General Johnston. In position at Jackson, and engaged in the fighting around that place from 10th to 16th of July, losing several men killed and wounded. After the evacuation of Jackson, retreated with Johnston's army to Forrest and Morton. Thence to Enterprise, and from there to Mobile, and remained there till November 21, 1863, when ordered to the Army of Tennessee. Reached Dalton November 27, just after the defeat at Missio
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
sof-marque. At this time, the practice of privateering had been somewhat discredited by the general concurrence of European States in the Declaration of the Congress of Paris. But the Southern leaders counted upon a support abroad that would not be weakened by the influence of sentimental considerations; and as the United States had not subscribed the Declaration, neither party was bound by its articles. When the circular invitation of the Powers was sent to this Government in 1856, Secretary Marcy proposed to amend the rules by the addition of a new article, exempting private property at sea from capture. No action was taken on the proposal, and the negotiations were suspended until President Lincoln's accession to office. About a week after Davis's proclamation was issued, the Department of State instructed the Minister of the United States at London to reopen negotiations, and offered to accede unconditionally to the Declaration. This proposal seemed to point too strongly to
te to Halleck: I am just in receipt of a letter from General G. B. McClellan, saying that he proposes visiting Europe soon with his family, and that Mrs. McClellan desires to see her father before starting, and requests a leave of absence for Colonel Marcy [Mrs. McClellan's father], that this desire may be gratified. I do not know the special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not inconsistent with the public service, however, I wish the leave to be granted from Washington. Sherman was to move immediately after the election, and on the 11th of November, he sent his last despatch. It was addressed to Halleck as chief of staff, but intended of course for Grant and the government. I have balanced all the figures well, he said, and am satisfied that General Thomas has in Tennessee a force sufficient for all probabilities. To Thomas he said, on the same day: You could s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e expiration of that time the battery returned to New Orleans and was mustered out of service. In May, 1846, another requisition was made upon the State of Louisiana, now for a brigade of four regiments of infantry. The Washington regiment was the first to offer its services, and was the first in the field. The Washington Artillery, acting as infantry, was Company A of the regiment, and served with it, under Taylor, until all the volunteers on the Rio Grande line were, by orders of Secretary Marcy, sent home and discharged. From that period the company, in face of all adverse circumstances—the neglect of the State and city authorities, the absence of any appropriations for their support—constantly maintained their organization in a state of efficiency and readiness for service at the individual cost of the members. Such was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
e expiration of that time the battery returned to New Orleans and was mustered out of service. In May, 1846, another requisition was made upon the State of Louisiana, now for a brigade of four regiments of infantry. The Washington regiment was the first to offer its services, and was the first in the field. The Washington Artillery, acting as infantry, was Company A of the regiment, and served with it, under Taylor, until all the volunteers on the Rio Grande line were, by orders of Secretary Marcy, sent home and discharged. From that period the company, in face of all adverse circumstances—the neglect of the State and city authorities, the absence of any appropriations for their support—constantly maintained their organization in a state of efficiency and readiness for service at the individual cost of the members. Such was the spirit of the Washington Artillery more than forty years ago, and, I am proud to say, such it has ever been and such it is to-day. After the war wi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters and times of the Tylers. (search)
ates; of Jefferson, Madison, and Monroe, distinguished for their writings, and also of Buchanan and Tyler. The same is true of cabinet officers from Hamilton, of Washington's administration, down through many administrations, embracing such learned authors and men distinguished in literature and science as are rarely found connected with official station. Among them may be found Rodney, Gallatin, Wirt, Calhoun, Rush, Kendall, Woodbury, Poinsett, Paulding, Webster, Legare, Walker, Bancroft, Marcy. It is also a striking truth that each branch of our national Congress has been elevated by many members distinguished for science, literature and authorship. With the United States there is in learning and science—and all the beautiful accomplishments of literature, as in the constitutional forms of government—a true republicanism that admits to favor the deserving and meritorious of all classes, and this constitutes its national nobility reflective of virtue, learning and cultivated ta
te to Halleck: I am just in receipt of a letter from General G. B. McClellan, saying that he proposes visiting Europe soon with his family, and that Mrs. McClellan desires to see her father before starting, and requests a leave of absence for Colonel Marcy [Mrs. McClellan's father], that this desire may be gratified. I do not know the special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not inconsistent with the public service, however, I wish the leave to be granted from Washington. Sherman was to move immediately after the election, and on the 11th of November, he sent his last despatch. It was addressed to Halleck as chief of staff, but intended of course for Grant and the government. I have balanced all the figures well, he said, and am satisfied that General Thomas has in Tennessee a force sufficient for all probabilities. To Thomas he said, on the same day: You could s
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