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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 8 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Marcy or search for Marcy in all documents.

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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 22: the secret service fund--charges against Webster, 1845-46. (search)
illuminate it by his own light. His wife was a charming woman, with the best, but the most pronounced, type of New England manners — reserved to a fault, but very sweet and approachable to the few she accepted as congenial to her taste. Governor Marcy was one of the lions of that time. His wife was a sterling woman, who had a great deal of social talent united to an unconventional honesty remarkable in a woman of the world. They were wealthy, and entertained with ease and profusion. Hen earnest to spare time for social intercourse, but he held well in hand a great deal of caustic wit, and never, though rather testy, ill-naturedly gave it the reins without great provocation. An old diplomat once said that he never understood Mr. Marcy's prominence in politics until he made him angry, Und den I say here is von lion who is dressed for every day like von lamb. We saw but little socially of the President's family during Mr. Polk's administration. We then did not keep a carri
ll-nigh perfected General Scott was sent to Mexico with orders which enabled him at discretion to strip General Taylor of both troops and material of war. Secretary Marcy and General Taylor had a sharp controversy, conducted by a series of letters, about the capitulation, and General Taylor, much to the astonishment of the public, had decidedly the advantage of Governor Marcy, who was a master of fence. Mr. Davis was at the camp-fire when General Taylor wrote it, and said: General Taylor's reply to Secretary Marcy's strictures, in regard to the capitulation of Monterey, exhibited such vigor of thought and grace of expression that many attributed and said: General Taylor's reply to Secretary Marcy's strictures, in regard to the capitulation of Monterey, exhibited such vigor of thought and grace of expression that many attributed it to a member of his staff who had a literary reputation, but it was written by his own hand, in the open air, by his campfire at Victoria.
.; but at last the lead poison was ascertained to be a fact, and the excitement quieted down, but the accident plunged many families into mourning. Mississippi lost a gallant soldier, a faithful advocate, and useful citizen from this cause, General John Anthony Quitman, and she mourned him with a deep sense of his rare moral qualities and great civil and military services. The day of the inauguration I went to Willard's Hotel parlor to see the procession, and Mr. Buchanan, Mr. Cass, and Governor Marcy came to speak to me. I was much impressed with Mr. Buchanan's kind, deferential manner, and the friendly way in which he inquired for Mr. and Mrs. Pierce. He was gracious because he felt kindly. After the ceremony, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce returned at once to Concord and resumed the course of their former quiet and uneventful lives. In the summer, Mr. and Mrs. Pierce and Nathaniel Hawthorne made the tour through Europe of which Hawthorne, in his published diaries, wrote so charmingly.
s in our furnished house, and being very tired, dropped asleep. He was a very large man and proved too much for the chair, so it gave way with a crack which wakened him. He rose deliberately, examined the chair for some minutes, then looked at me quizzically, and said, You know a man is heavier when he is asleep, do you suppose it possible I could have been asleep? He lived a few doors from us, and Mr. Cushing boarded not far off. Mr. Campbell lived more in the centre of the city, and Governor Marcy only a few squares from the Executive Mansion. Mr. Dobbin, the Secretary of the Navy, was also quite near, so that the Executive family of Mr. Pierce could be summoned to a meeting in an hour or less time. From this house, which had been taken by Mr. Benjamin for the winter, we moved in a few months to one round the corner on Thirteenth Street, and there lived a year. There our only child sickened, and after several weeks of pain and steady decline, died at twenty-three months old;