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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Marcy or search for Marcy in all documents.

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ainst the peace and dignity of their respective States; and in at least one case a formal requisition was made upon the Governor of New York for the surrender of an Abolitionist who had never trod the soil of the offended State; but the Governor (Marcy), though ready to do what he lawfully could to propitiate Southern favor, was constrained respectfully to decline. That error of opinion may be safely tolerated where reason is left free to combat it, Jefferson's Inaugural Address. is a tr of the people they insult. Ought not, we ask, our city authorities to make them understand this — to tell them that they prosecute their treasonable and Beastly plans at their own peril? --New York Courier and Enquirer, 11th July, 1834. Governor Marcy followed in the footsteps of his party chief. In his Annual Message of January 5, 1836--five weeks later than the foregoing — he said: Relying on the influence of a sound and enlightened public opinion to restrain and control the miscond
e the natural boundaries between the Anglo-Saxon and the Mauritanian races. there ends the valley of the West. There Mexico begins. * * * We ought to stop there, because interminable conflicts must ensue, either on our going South or their coming North of that gigantic boundary. While peace is cherished, that boundary will be kept sacred. Not till the spirit of conquest rages, will the people on either side molest or mix with each other. The correspondence between the Secretary of War (Gov. Marcy) and Gen. Taylor, which preceded and inspired this movement, clearly indicates that Mr. Polk and his Cabinet desired Gen. Taylor to debark at, occupy, and hold, the east bank of the Rio Grande, though they shrank from the responsibility of giving an order to that effect, hoping that Gen. Taylor would take a hint, as Gen. Jackson was accustomed to do in his Florida operations, and do what was desired in such manner as would enable the Government to disavow him, and evade the responsibility
ity, or the presumed interests, of Human Slavery. In the Democratic National Convention, on the first ballot for a Presidential candidate, Gen. Cass received 117 votes, Mr. Buchanan 93, and there were 78 scattered among eight others, of whom Gov. Marcy and Mr. Douglas were foremost. On the third ballot, Gen. Cass received 119; but he then began to decline; and on the thirteenth his vote had sunk to 99, while Mr. Douglas's had risen to 50, and his friends had high hopes. On the fourteenth bay-third, and to 53 on this. Franklin Pierce, of New Hampshire, was first named on this ballot, receiving 15 votes. He ran up to 30 on the next; fell back to 29 on the following; and there stood till the forty-sixth, when he received 44; while Gov. Marcy received 97; Gen. Cass 78; Mr. Buchanan 28; and Mr. Douglas 32, with 8 scattering. On the forty-eighth, Gen. Pierce received 55, and on the next 232 votes-being all that were cast but six--and was declared the candidate. For Vice-President, W
pain draw any unfavorable inference from this refusal; the rather, as the emphatic disclaimer of any designs against Cuba on the part of this Government, contained in the present note, affords all the assurance which the President can constitutionally, or to any useful purpose, give, of a practical concurrence with France and England in the wish not to disturb the possession of that island by Spain. Soon after the passage of the Nebraska bill, President Pierce, through a dispatch from Gov. Marcy as Secretary of State, Dated Washington, August 16, 1854. directed Messrs. James Buchanan, John Y. Mason, and Pierre Soule, our Embassadors at London, Paris, and Madrid respectively, to convene in some European city, there to confer with regard to the best means of getting possession of Cuba. They met accordingly at Ostend, October 9, 1854. and sat three days; adjourning thence to Aix-la-Chapelle, where they held sweet council together for several days more, and the result of their
amilton, 357; 497. Madisonian, The, letter from Gilmer to, 156. Magoffin, Beriah, of Ky., elected Governor, 333; his Union Address, 340; his answer to the Presidents requisition, etc., 460; his Message, 492-3; 493; 494; 496; 509; 609; his letter to the President, 610; the reply, 611; Message, 611, 612; Zollicoffer to, 613. Magrath, Judge, of S. C., 336; 345. Magruder, J. B., 506; 529; 531. Maine, admission of into the Union, 79-80; 326. Mallory, Stephen R., of Fla., 429. Marcy, Gov., of N. Y., 122; extract from his Message, 124; 186; 222; 273. Markle, Capt., (Union,) killed at Belmont, 597. Marmaduke, Col., routed at Booneville, Mo., 574. Marshall, Chief Justice, 106; 109; 110; 252. Marshall, Humphrey, of Ky., 539; 614 Marston, Col. Gilman, at Bull Run, 525. Martin, Luther, 44; 107. Maryland, 36; first Abolition Society in, 107; 142; withdraws from the Douglas Convention, 318; 849; population in 1860, 351; 461; 468; Butler lands at Annapolis,