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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Marcy or search for Marcy in all documents.

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r than before. About 6 P. M., we ran a little farther up, and threw in a few shell with good effect. 9 P. M. The firing has about ceased. News on shore--Slaughter immense--Enemy in full retreat. 10 P. M. McClellan has just returned with Gen. Marcy. Mae says They took one gun from us yesterday; but to-day we have taken many of their guns and colors. Yes, said Marcy, we whipped them like the devil to-day. 12 M. From what I can gather from the conversation of McClellan. we may exMarcy, we whipped them like the devil to-day. 12 M. From what I can gather from the conversation of McClellan. we may expect to see the major part of the army at Harrison's Landing to-morrow. Gen. McClellan, in his report, says: I left Haxall's for Malvern soon after day-break. Accompanied by several general officers, I once more made the entire circuit of the position, and then returned to Haxall's, whence I went with Capt. Rodgers to select the final location for the army and its d, depots. I returned to Malvern before the serious lighting commenced; and, after riding along the lines, and seeing most
ps is in motion; started about 6 A. M. I can give him but two squadrons of cavalry. I propose moving Gen. Cox to Upton's Hill, to hold that important point with its works, and to push cavalry scouts to Vienna, via Freedom Hill and Hunter's Lane. Cox has two squadrons of cavalry. Please answer at once whether this meets your approval. I have directed Woodbury, with the Engineer brigade, to hold Fort Lyon, however. Detailed last night two regiments to the vicinity of Forts Ethan Allen and Marcy. Meagher's brigade is still at Acquia. If he moves in support of Franklin, it leaves us without any reliable troops in and near Washington. Yet Franklin is too weak alone. What shall be done? No more cavalry arrived; have but three squadrons. Franklin has but forty rounds of ammunition, and no wagons to move more. I do not think Franklin is in condition to accomplish much, if he meets with serious resistance. I should not have moved him but for your pressing order of last night. What
llandigham, of Ohio, while ably advocated by Mr. Bingham, of Ohio; and passed by a (substantially) party vote: Yeas 83; Nays 44. Having been received by the Senate and referred to its Military Committee, it was duly reported March 4. therefrom by Mr. II. Wilson; vehemently opposed by Messrs. Garret Davis, of Ky., Carlile, of Va., Saulsbury, of Del., and supported by Messrs. Wilson, of Mass., Howard, of Michigan, Sherman, of Ohio, McDougall, of Cal., and Anthony, of R. I., and passed: Marcy 10. Yeas 29; Nays 9--a party vote, save that Mr. McDougall, of Cal., voted Yea. The bill thus enacted was approved by the President, March 13th, 1862. Gen. Wilson, upon evidence that the above act was inadequate to restrain the negro-catching propensitives of some officers in the service, proposed April 3. further action to the same end; and the Senate considered April 14. his resolution of inquiry. Mr. Grimes, of Iowa, in supporting it made a statement as follows: In the month
of Ky., moved Dec. 21, 1863. to insert-- Provided, That no part of the moneys aforesaid shall be applied to the raising, arming, equipping, or paying of negro soldiers. Which was likewise beaten: Yeas 41; Yays 105--the Yeas (all Democrats) being Messrs. Ancona, Bliss, James S. Brown, Coffroth, Cox, Dawson, Dennison, Eden, Edgerton, Eldridge, Finck, Grider, Hall, Harding, Harrington, Benjamin G. Harris, Charles M. Harris, Philip Johnson, William Johnson, King, Knapp, Law, Long, Marcy, McKinney, William II. Miller, James R. Morris, Morrison, Noble, John O'Neill, Pendleton, Sainuel J. Randall, Rogers, Ross, Scott, Stiles, Strouse, Stuart, Chilton A. White, Joseph W. White, Yeaman. No other War measure was so strenuously, unitedly, persistently, vehemently resisted by the Opposition, whether Democratic or Border-State Unionists, as was the proposal to arm Blacks to uphold the National cause. Said Mr. S. S. Cox, of Ohio: I believe the object of gentlemen, in forcin
iller, S. J. Randall, Stiles, Strouse. Maryland--B. G. Harris. Kentucky--Clay, Grider, Harding, Mallory, Wadsworth. Ohio — Bliss, Cox, Finck, Wm. Johnson, Long, J. R. Morris, Noble, J. O'Neill, Pendleton, C. A. White, J. W. White. Indiana--Cravens, Edgerton, Harrington, Holman, Law. Illinois--J. C. Allen, W. J. Allen, Eden, C. M. Harris, Knapp, Morrison, Robinson, Ross, Stuart. Wisconsin--J. S. Brown, Eldridge. Missouri--Hall, Scott.--Total, 56. Not Voting--Lazear, Pa.; Marcy, N. H.; McDowell and Voorhees, Ind.; Le Blond and McKinney, Ohio; Middleton and Rogers, N. J.--all Democrats. [By the subsequent ratification of more than two-thirds of the States, this Amendment has become a part of the Federal Constitution.] Several informal attempts at opening negotiations for the termination of hostilities were made in the course of this Winter--Hon. Francis P. Blair, of Maryland, visiting Richmond twice on the subject, with the consent, though not by the reques