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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 11 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 10 8 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 5 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 9 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 7 7 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for Marcy or search for Marcy in all documents.

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ad, in regular fortifications, much narrower in mere earthworks or entrenched positions. The side of the ditch nearest the place is the scarp or escarp, and the opposite side, the counterscarp, is usually made circular opposite to the salient angles of the works. See bastion. Under the ancient system of fortification, the ditch was frequently dug on the inside, thus anticipating by some thousands of years the improvement of Pillow, during the Mexican war, — He who dug for Polk and Marcy Ditch and rampart vi-ce var-sy. The object of the savages is evident. It was to obtain shelter for the bodies of the archers with the least amount of labor; and by this system they most readily obtained the required shelter, having the benefit of the ditch and the bank. The Mandan Indians adopted this plan. The system is seen in the modern rifle-pit. The fossu around a Roman encampment was usually 9 feet broad and 7 feet deep; but if an attack was apprehended, it was made 13 feet w
at the moment of their production, by the decomposition at a high temperature of a mixture of sal ammoniac and a substance supplying proto or carbonated hydrogen; (2) for the making of cast-steel from scraps of iron, cemented by the process above described, and melted by the same operation: and (3) the fabrication of steel by the fusion of cemented iron sponge produced by the reduction of ores, forge scoriae, etc., by means of gas derived from peat or hydrogenous matters. Newton, 1848, Marcy, 1849, directed a stream of air, or of air mingled with carbonic oxide, upon the surface of the molten metal in a reverberatory furnace. This failed for lack of penetration. Nasmyth employed blowing-tubes to inject steam below the surface of the metal, to agitate the iron mechanically, and by the decomposition of the steam furnish oxygen for the removal of the carbon, and hydrogen for separating the sulphur and phosphorus. The process failed by too great a reduction of temperature. M
ipitate is washed, dried, and, by means of suitable varnish or other agent, applied directly or mediately to the object. It changes color at about 160° Fah., but resumes its natural color when the temperature is reduced. The second is a bright yellow silver precipitate, produced by adding a solution of silver nitrate to the hydrargyro-iodide solution above. For many purposes the compounds may be applied to cardboard, leather, or thin metal, and by this means attached to the object. Marcy's thermoscope consists of a thin copper tube of very small bore, and having a bulb at one end. This is inserted within a glass tube, fixed on the periphery of a wheel to which it corresponds in curvature. The tube is hermetically sealed at one end, and in it is poured a certain amount of mercury, which assumes the lowest position in the tube. The axis of the wheel carries a hand which serves as a pointer on a graduated index, and the wheel is balanced on knife-edges. The instrument is par
.Name and Date. 144,998.Mayall, Nov. 25, 1873. 85,945.Marquard, Jan 19, 1869. 144,622.Lamb, Nov. 18, 1873. 144,623.Lamb. Nov. 18, 1873. 10,738.Goodyear, Ap. 4, 1854. 24,996.De Wolfe, Aug. 9, 1859. 23,151.Beins, March 8, 1859. 23,773.Mayall, April 26, 1859. 27,706.Eaton, April 3, 1860. 30,807.Falke et al., Dec. 4, 1860. 27,798.Harris, April 10, 1860. 23,855.Parmelee, May 3, 1859. 24,401.Parmelee, June 14, 1859. 10,339.Meyer, Dec. 20, 1853. 33,303.Gately, Sept. 17, 1861. 11,897Marcy, Nov. 7, 1854. 17,037.Herring, Ap. 14, 1867. 7,816.Trotter, Dec. 3, 1850. 10,586.Meyer, Feb. 28, 1854. 56,670.Cutler, July 24, 1866. 37,523.Roberts, Jan. 27, 1863. 24,695.Eaton, July 5, 1859. 125,707.Walker et al., Ap. 16, 1872. 26,172.Eaton, Nov. 22, 1859. 153,447.Meyer, July 28, 1874. 153,448.Meyer, July 28, 1874. 153,449.Meyer, July 28, 1874. 153,450.Meyer, July 28, 1874. Coloring Vulcanite. 99,956.Schlesinger, Feb. 15, 1870.99,885.Halliday, Feb. 15, 1870. Vulcanite