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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 1 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
ssador, and therefore the very sovereign present, besides being rich, there is a state and magnificence in his house such as I have not seen anywhere else. . . . . Where it is not necessary for him to play the king, he is simple and unaffected; and his literary dinners, if not so pleasant as those of the Russian minister, because he has not the personal means to make them so, are still much sought after,. . . . and it is thought no small distinction to be invited to them. . . . . The Marquis de Marialva is, I suppose, the most considerable Portuguese by his talents, and the most important by his influence, that has remained in Europe since the Court went to the Brazils; certainly he is one of the most elegant and accomplished gentlemen I have met. He is the only man I have seen in Europe who has come up to my ideas of a consummate courtier,—taken in the good sense of the word; for though in all companies he was the first man, from his position, yet the elegance of his manners and the
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
ds from Lisbon, had of course seen everything at Cintra for the thousandth time; but each morning after breakfast, mules were brought to the door for us all, and the whole cavalcade of nine or ten persons set out to scramble over the rocks together. In this way we went successively to the palace where Alphonso VI. has left the traces of his weary footsteps, and where he died in 1669, after an imprisonment of seven years; to the sete ahis,— seven sighs,—the country-seat of the Marquis of Marialva, where the famous Convention of Cintra was signed; to Penhaverde, the favorite retreat of Don Joao de Castro, the great navigator and powerful viceroy of the Indies. . . .; to Mon Serrate, the romantic, elegant seclusion of that Mr. Beckford whom Lord Byron has justly damned to eternal memory under the name of Vathek; From the story of that name, of which he was the author.—Childe Harold, Canto I. Stanza 22. to the Quinta da Penha, to Colares, and, finally, to the rock which forms the m<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
, and struck for the third time with the bustle which, from so far, announces the traveller's approach to the largest and most active capital in Europe. . . . . I went to see the kind and respectable Sir Joseph Banks several times, and renewed my acquaintance with the Marquess of Lansdowne, passed a night with my excellent friend Mr. Vaughan, etc. . . . . I found here, too, Count Funchal,. . . . and was very glad to know more of Count Palmella, whom I had known a little at the Marquis of Marialva's, and who is certainly an accomplished gentleman and scholar, as well as a statesman. See ante, pp. 180 and 248. Palmella had been Portuguese plenipotentiary at the Congress of Vienna, and afterwards held other high offices. I have met few men in Europe who have so satisfied my expectations as this extraordinary young man, who, at the age of about thirty, has thus risen to the height of power, in one of the most despotic governments in the world, by the mere force of talent, without fr