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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Ancestral (search)
ng! If Julia Ward was part Ward and Greene, she was quite as much Cutler and Marion; it is to this descent that we must turn for the best explanation of her many-sf Thomas Mitchell'and Esther (or Hester) Marion. To most people, the name of Marion suggests one person only,--General Francis Marion of Revolutionary fame; yet itGeneral Francis Marion of Revolutionary fame; yet it was the grandfather of the General, Benjamin Marion, of La Rochelle, who was the first of the name to settle in this country, coming hither when the Revocation of thth bright eyes and a humorous mouth. A word remains to be said about General Francis Marion himself. This hero of history, song, and romance was childless; our moress in the course of which she alluded to her Southern descent, and to General Francis Marion, her great-great-uncle. As she spoke her eyes lightened with mirth, in the way we all remember: General Marion, she said, was known in his generation as the Swamp Fox ; and when I succeed in eluding the care of my guardians, children an
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: little Julia Ward 1819-1835; aet. 1-16 (search)
, 1819, a second daughter was born, and named Julia. Julia Ward was very little when her parents moved to a large house on the Bowling Green, a region of high fashion in those days. Reminiscences, p. 4. Here were born three more children: Francis Marion, Louisa Cutler, and Ann Eliza. For some time before the birth of the lastnamed child, Mrs. Ward's health had been gradually failing, though every known measure had been used to restore it. There had been journeys to Niagara and up the Hudsonthat they must on no account venture near the attic stairs, as an old man in red was sitting there. Of course the little Fatimas must needs peep, and the old man was always there, a terrible figure, his face hidden. In Broa Sam's absence it was Marion who played the outlaw and descended like a whirlwind upon the unhappy ladies, who were journeying through dense and dreadful forests. Mrs. Mills, Mrs. Brown, and Mrs. Francis were devoted mothers, and reared large families of dolls. They kept
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: the corner --1835-1839; aet. 16-20 (search)
the Bible with the best commentaries, and daily a verse or two of the best poetry. In the days when Julia was going round the corner to Mrs. Smith's school, Sam was newly returned from a long course of study and travel abroad, while Henry and Marion were at Round Hill School under the care of Dr. Joseph Greene Cogswell and Mr. George Bancroft. The former was a beloved friend of the Ward family, and often visited them. We have pleasant glimpses of the household at this time, when the lines n, and brought the seals. Nothing was said on either side, but the habit was abandoned. Mr. Ward's anxious care for his children's welfare extended to every branch of their conduct. One evening, walking with Julia, he met his sons, Henry and Marion, each with a cigar in his mouth. He was much troubled, and said: Boys, you must give this up, and I will give it up too. From this time I forbid you to smoke, and I will join you in relinquishing the habit. He never smoked again; nor did the
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
lled features, and the beauty of her hands and arms, made an ensemble which could not fail to impress all who saw her Add to this her singing, her wit, and the charm which was all and always her own, and we have the Diva Julia, as she was called by some who loved her. Her sisters, also, were growing up, each exquisitely attractive in her way: they became known as the Three graces of Bond Street. Louisa was like a damask rose, Annie like a dark lily; dark, too, of eyes and hair were Sam and Marion, while Henry was fair and blue-eyed. At this distance of time, it may not be unpardonable to touch briefly on another aspect of our mother's youth; indeed, it would hardly be candid to avoid it. From the first she seems to have stirred the hearts of men. Her masters, old and young, fell in love with her almost as a matter of course. Gilded youth and sober middle-age fared no better; her girlhood passed to the sound of sighing. Mfy dear, said an intimate friend of the three, speaking o
of, II, 254. Mann, Horace, I, 73, 79, 83, 94, 121, 123, 169, 185, 227. Mann, Mary P., I, 79, 80, 169. Manning, H. E., II, 165. Mansfield, I, 378. Mansfield, Richard, II, 8, 313. Mansion House, II, 8. Mapleson, Col., II, 103. Margherita, Queen, II, 30, 248, 277. Marie, Peter, II, 54, 202. Marienburg, II, 14. Mariette, A. E., II, 36. Mario (Marchese di Candia), I, 86, 87, 316; II, 250, 350. Marion, Benjamin, I, 10-12. Marion, Esther, I, 10, 12. Marion, Francis, I, 10-14; II, 351. Marion, Gabriel, I, 12. Marion, Judith, I, 11, 12. Marion, Peter, I, 12. Marne, M., I, 328. Marsaba, II, 38, 41. Marseilles, I, 97. Marshalsea, I, 83. Martin, Mrs., II, 170. Martineau, James, II, 159, 161, 348. Marzials, Mr., II, 167. Massachusetts, I, 129, 168, 195, 249; II, 358. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I, 297; II, 77, 80. Massachusetts Legislature, I, 168, 220, 344, 366, 368; II, 405. Massachusetts Press Club