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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 48 48 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 15 15 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 11 11 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 8 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 3 3 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 3 3 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life. You can also browse the collection for Mark Twain or search for Mark Twain in all documents.

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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
too—it is getting the best part of France to talk with him. How unimportant is physical ugliness in a man! If I were a woman I should fall in love with him, delicate and feeble as he is physically. Of a farewell dinner given for Wilkie Collins in 1874, Colonel Higginson wrote:— There were only eight literary men there and I remember noticing how much brighter were Mr. Whittier's eyes than those of anybody else, though he looks old and thin and sick. On this occasion he first saw Mark Twain who impressed him as something of a buffoon, though with earnestness underneath; and when afterwards at his own house in Hartford, I heard him say grace at table, it was like asking a blessing over Ethiopian minstrels. But he had no wine at his table and that seemed to make the grace a genuine thing. This hasty estimate of the popular humorist was a passing one, and the acquaintance developed into a cordial friendship. Public men as well as authors and artists were drawn to Newport,
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XVI: the crowning years (search)
ds after their owners had gone. Oct. 10, Felt as I strolled about after breakfast that I should be willing to go to sleep for the winter and wake up to find myself here [Dublin] again. There is still woodchopping to be done and I hate to leave it. Of our neighbors the Abbot Thayers, he said they live outdoors, know all birds and butterflies, and rear the latter from the chrysalis till they flutter in and out of the great sitting-room as if it were their home. One summer we had Mark Twain for a neighbor:— Called on Clemens. Found him in bed where he prefers to write, a strange picturesque object, in night clothes, with curly white hair standing up over his head. The bed was covered with written sheets which his daughter carried off at intervals, to be copied by her on typewriter, his secretary only writing his correspondence. He often leaves off anything in the middle and begins on something else and goes back to it. He has always worked in this way and likes it.
ford, 351, 352; at Salisbury, 352, 353; at Paris, 353; in Switzerland, 353; journey to Europe (1901), 353-62; impressions of Granada, 353; at Castellamare, 353, 354; illness of his daughter, 354; at Capri, 355; at Florence, 355-57; in England, 357-59; in London, 359, 360; at the Winchester celebration, 360-62; revisits the South (1878), 362-64; another visit to the South (1904), 364-66; and colored people at Boston, 366-67; visits Gettysburg, 370, 371; summers in Dublin, N. H., 371-76; and Mark Twain, 373, 374; verses for Smith outdoor theatre, 374; and Dublin village life, 374, 375; desires to be Harvard's oldest graduate, 376, 398; interest in students, 376, 377; receives degrees, 377, 378; kindliness of, 378, 379; at polls, 380; death of sister, 381; at Columbus celebration, 381; seventieth birthday, 381; lectures at Western Reserve, 382; illness, 382-84; gives away books, 384, 385; renewed activity, 385, 386, 392; book about, 386, 387; Cheerful Yesterdays, 382; and Shaw monument, 3