hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 86 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 23 1 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 18 14 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 17 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Marmaduke or search for Marmaduke in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 10: General Mitchel's invasion of Alabama.--the battles of Shiloh. (search)
er our open floor; and at dawn we went out, while the cuckoo's song was sweetest and the mocking-bird's varied carols were loudest, and rambled far over the battle-field, meeting here a tree cut dowdy by shot near its base, there a huge one split by a shell that passed through it and plunged deeply into another beyond, and everywhere little hillocks covering the remains of the slain. After an early breakfast we rode to Pittsburg Landing, and made the sketch seen on page 263, and then, riding along the greater portion of the lines of battle from Lick Creek to Owl Creek, we visited the site of Shiloh Meeting-house, made a drawing of it, and again striking the Corinth road at the ruins of widow Rey's house, returned Effects of a shot E Shiloh Meeting-House. to that village by way of Farmington, where Paine and Marmaduke had a skirmish, See page 292. in time to take the afternoon train to the scene of another battle, Iuka Springs, twenty miles eastward. Tail-piece — broken arm
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
ghtailing's Illinois and Hezcock's Ohio batteries; and the Second Michigan cavalry. on a reconnoissance in force toward the hamlet of Farmington, an outpost of the Confederates, about five miles northwest of Corinth, and then in command of General Marmaduke, of Missouri. See page 540, volume I. His troops, about forty-five thousand strong, were in the woods around the little log meeting-house near the hamlet. Marmaduke made very little resistance when attacked, but fled to the lines at CorMarmaduke made very little resistance when attacked, but fled to the lines at Corinth, leaving as spoils for the victors about thirty of his command slain and a hundred wounded; also his camp, with all its supplies, and two hundred prisoners. The National loss was two killed and eleven wounded. The cavalry and artillery pushed on to Glendale, a little east of Corinth, and destroyed the railway track and two important trestle-bridges there. In the mean time, General Wallace had sent out April 30. Colonel Morgan L. Smith, with three battalions of cavalry and a brigade of in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
d the consisting of a strong body of cavalry under Marmaduke, was at Cane till, about thirty miles south of himur days, and thirty pieces of artillery, to attack Marmaduke. They marched twenty-seven miles that day, bivouaers and Rabb's battery, were within half a mile of Marmaduke's camp before they met with resistance. The main illery duel was kept up until their approach, when Marmaduke retreated to his reserves on the Boston Mountains, Mountains was four killed and thirty-six wounded. Marmaduke had seventy-five killed. The number of his woundednd men, including two thousand cavalry, and joined Marmaduke at a point fifteen miles northward. Informed of teen smitten and broken ten miles from Cane Hill by Marmaduke's horsemen. Herron was now in a perilous positiis danger, but failed, because of the vigilance of Marmaduke's cavalry; and that active and earnest officer was. A greater portion of the latter were captured by Marmaduke when he first attacked Herron's cavalry. General