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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 86 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 75 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 23 1 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 18 14 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 17 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 15 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Marmaduke or search for Marmaduke in all documents.

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forces in Arkansas, as was stated in my last annual report, left the frontier of the former exposed to raids, of which the rebels were prompt to take advantage. Marmaduke, with the advance of Hindman's rebel army, moved forward with the purpose of entering the south-west of Missouri. Before the enemy could concentrate his forces ur days after the combat of Cave Hill, from reliable information it was ascertained that Hindman's army had crossed the Arkansas River and formed a junction with Marmaduke at Lee's Creek, fifteen miles north of Van Buren, to which point the latter had retreated after the action of the twenty-eighth of November. The united rebel f, of which nine hundred and fifty-three were of Herron's division. Early in January, 1863, a rebel force, estimated at from four thousand to six thousand, under Marmaduke, moved upon Lawrence Mills, and proceeded by way of Ozark to the attack of Springfield, Missouri, to which place our small force, consisting chiefly of militia,
e second, it moved from Spoonville in the direction of Washington, and at nine miles from the former place, encountered Marmaduke and Cabell, in considerable force. The next obstacle was Little Red River, a rapid stream and difficult to cross. Genf the army southward, at right angles with the former course. The troops sent forward on the military road encountered Marmaduke and Shelby in force, and kept them in play; but at the same time, Shelby attacked the rear of the army, under command oColonel Engleman's brigade had a serious engagement at Okolona, and soundly thrashed the enemy. On the succeeding day, Marmaduke and Cabell, with a force of four or five thousand men, made a furious attack, but were easily driven off, our army capturing, among other prisoners, two lieutenants, one of them a member of Marmaduke's staff. The army remained here a day or two, waiting for General Thayer to come up, who had been obliged to come by a different route from the one originally intended