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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), The oldest road in Cambridge. (search)
, the districts east, north and west were wildernesses. The tracts nearest to the river were known as marshes --Windmill Marsh, Ox Marsh, Ship Marsh, Common Marsh, and Long Marsh, as they were named in order, as we go from a point near the hospitalOx Marsh, Ship Marsh, Common Marsh, and Long Marsh, as they were named in order, as we go from a point near the hospital eastward to the Brookline bridge. All the lower Port was then known as the Great Marsh. The higher ground outside the pales or palisades, with which the settlement was at first surrounded, was used as pasture-ground, that to the northwest being knMarsh, and Long Marsh, as they were named in order, as we go from a point near the hospital eastward to the Brookline bridge. All the lower Port was then known as the Great Marsh. The higher ground outside the pales or palisades, with which the settlement was at first surrounded, was used as pasture-ground, that to the northwest being known as the Cow common, and that to the northeast being called the Ox-pasture. At first this was south of the Charlestown Path, but later a tract was added to the north of it. The pales ran along a little north of where Gore Hall stands, and the groMarsh, as they were named in order, as we go from a point near the hospital eastward to the Brookline bridge. All the lower Port was then known as the Great Marsh. The higher ground outside the pales or palisades, with which the settlement was at first surrounded, was used as pasture-ground, that to the northwest being known as the Cow common, and that to the northeast being called the Ox-pasture. At first this was south of the Charlestown Path, but later a tract was added to the north of it. The pales ran along a little north of where Gore Hall stands, and the ground outside of them we may think of as covered with forest consisting of oaks, pines and walnuts, as Dr. Holmes says, with a narrow wood-road finding its way among them. This road was first called The Charlestown Path, and was variously designate