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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 3 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
me skirmishing during the day and while covering the retreat of the army.] Col. Dixon S. Miles. First Brigade, Col. Louis Blenker: 8th N. Y. (Vols.) Lieut.-Col. Julius Stahel; 29th N. Y., Col. Adolph von Steinwehr; 39th N. Y. (Garibaldi Guards), Col. F. G. D'Utassy; 27th Penna., Col. Max Einstein; A, 2d U. S. Arty., Capt. John C. Tidball; Bookwood's N. Y. battery, Captain Charles Bookwood. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 16; m, 96 = 118. Second Brigade, Col. Thomas A. Davies: 16th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Samuel Marsh; 18th N. Y., Col. W. A. Jackson; 31st N. Y., Col. C. E. Pratt; 32d N. Y., Col. R. Matheson; G, 2d U. S. Arty., Lieut. O. D. Greene. Brigade loss: w, 2; m, 1 = 3. Total loss of the Union army: killed, 460; wounded, 1124; captured or missing, 1312,--grand total, 2896. Strength of the Union army. General James B. Fry, who was General McDowell's adjutant-general, prepared in October, 1884, a statement of the strength of the army, in brief as follows: It was not practicable
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Appendix A. (search)
Lean. 3d New Jersey Three years volunteers. Colonel George W. Taylor. 41st New York Three years volunteers. Colonel Leopold von Gilsa. Fifth Division. In reserve at Centreville and not engaged in the battle proper. Had some skirmishing with the enemy during the day and while covering the retreat of the army. Colonel Dixon S. Miles. First Brigade. Colonel Louis Blenker. 8th New York (volunteers), Lieut.-Colonel Julius Stahel 29th New York (volunteers), Colonel Adolph von Steinwehr. 39th New York (volunteers), Colonel Frederick G. D'Utassy. 27th Pennsylvania, Colonel Max Einstein. Company A, 2d U. S. Artillery, Captain John C. Tidball. Bookwood's New York Battery, Captain Charles Bookwood. Second Brigade. Colonel Thomas A. Davies. 16th New York, Lieut.-Colonel Samuel Marsh. 18th New York, Colonel William A. Jackson. 31st New York, Colonel Calvin E. Pratt. 32d New York, Colonel Roderic Matheson. Company G, 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Oliver D. Greene.
ut. Tresilian, Engineer of the First division, renewed the old bridge, constructed a new one, corduroyed the valley of the stream, and repaired the road for the space of some five miles back. At this camp, Col. M. K. Lawler, Eighteenth Illinois, who had been in command of the First brigade during the illness of Brig.-Gen. John A. Logan, was relieved by that officer. Brig.-Gen. L. F. Ross was in command of the Second brigade, and Col. J. E. Smith, Forty-fifth Illinois, in the absence of Col. Marsh, Twentieth Illinois, on sick leave, was in command of the Third brigade. Col. Smith was here relieved of the command of the Third brigade by Col. Lawler, his senior in rank. Being visited by his Excellency, Richard Yates, Governor of the State of Illinois, at this place, the First division was drawn out and passed in review before him — receiving the honor of his congratulations for their patriotic devotion, the lustre they had shed upon Illinois, and their soldierly appearance and expe
nell, and Joseph Stone. Missing: Capt. S. M. Quincy. Company F--Wounded: Lieut. T. R. Robeson, shot through wrist; Corp. Marsh, breast, not serious; privates, Morrissy, lost forefinger of right hand; French, back, slight; Moore, back, slight. ed them from the heavy guns of Capt. Phillips's fort, but were driven back by the Fifth Ohio battery, under command of Lieut. Marsh, a very brave and competent officer. At daylight, on the fifth, the brigade started in pursuit of the retreating enemas unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twom men that had been brought in, every one had been dressed, laid upon cots, and tenderly cared for by him. Acting Assistant-Surgeons Marsh and Arnold were ordered to report to me on the field. I did not see them, and don't know what service they
Cook, hand, not serious; Corp. J. B. May, groin, severely; privates, S. W. Allen, hand, slightly; Wm. Daniels, seriously; Albert Fales, jaw, slightly; Edward Hogan; George Hunt, arm; John C. Johnston, severely and missing; David F. Mack, hand, very slight; Samuel A. Matthews, thigh; John Newcomb, hip; Michael O'Brien, both legs seriously, leg since amputated; Michael O'Donnell, and Joseph Stone. Missing: Capt. S. M. Quincy. Company F--Wounded: Lieut. T. R. Robeson, shot through wrist; Corp. Marsh, breast, not serious; privates, Morrissy, lost forefinger of right hand; French, back, slight; Moore, back, slight. Company G--Killed : Captain Richard Cary, Sergt. Wm. Andrews, privates, H. C. Hoxsey, H. O. Howard, Francis Hatch. Wounded: First Sergeant R. S. Williston, hand and leg seriously, leg since amputated; Sergt. M. P. Richardson, leg; Sergt. T. F. Page, hand and thigh, slightly; Corp. C. H. Hazelton, finger; privates, John Callanan, thigh; George J. Coles, knee; George R. D
ition by coming up a ravine which sheltered them from the heavy guns of Capt. Phillips's fort, but were driven back by the Fifth Ohio battery, under command of Lieut. Marsh, a very brave and competent officer. At daylight, on the fifth, the brigade started in pursuit of the retreating enemy; and continued the pursuit until the evreceived in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. JP. M., I found of the ninety of my wounded men that had been brought in, every one had been dressed, laid upon cots, and tenderly cared for by him. Acting Assistant-Surgeons Marsh and Arnold were ordered to report to me on the field. I did not see them, and don't know what service they rendered. First Lieut. Holly Shirman, A
panies, also attracted my special notice, while the regiment was in its position behind the crest of the hill, on the left of Barnett's battery, and before it relieved the Thirty-sixth Illinois and became actually engaged with the enemy at that point. Sergeant Rudolph, of company H, was conspicuous, among others of the regiment, in assisting at the battery. At ten A. M., the Third Missouri regiment charged past the right of our line of skirmishers upon a force of rebel infantry, and private Samuel Marsh, of company A, joined them in the pursuit. Charley Commure, a little drummer-boy, having lost his drum, took a musket and fought manfully in the line. The following is a list of our losses, and it seems impossible to credit our apparent miraculous escape. I take the liberty to say that I ascribe it, to a very great extent, to the consummate skill with which the regiment was handled by our brigade and division commanders. Killed, none. Wounded, private James Moneysmith, co
Sarah, dau. of Samson Salter, 25 Nov. 1735. One of their sons was Samson Salter Blowers, b. 10 Mar. 1741-2, grad. H. C. 1763, m. a dau. of, Benjamin Kent, was Ch. Justice of the Sup. Court in Nova Scotia, and d. Oct. 1842, having lived more than half a year beyond a full century. Bonner, John, came here from Boston about 1690. By second w. Mary Clark, who d. here 20 April 1697, he had Jane, b. 2 May 1691, m. John Ellery of Boston, 31–Aug. 1710; John, b. 6 Dec. 1693, m. Sarah, dau. of Samuel Marsh, 17 Nov. 1715; Thomas, b. 6 Jan. 1695-6, and d. 3 June 1719; buried in South Carolina. John the f. sold his house 1705, returned to Bos., and d. 30 Jan. 1725-6, a. 83 years. An obituary represents him as a gentleman very skillful and ingenious in many arts and sciences, especially in navigation, drawing, moulding of ships, &c.; one of the best acquainted with the coasts of North America, of any of his time; of great knowledge and judgment in marine affairs; was very much consulted, impr
Sarah, dau. of Samson Salter, 25 Nov. 1735. One of their sons was Samson Salter Blowers, b. 10 Mar. 1741-2, grad. H. C. 1763, m. a dau. of, Benjamin Kent, was Ch. Justice of the Sup. Court in Nova Scotia, and d. Oct. 1842, having lived more than half a year beyond a full century. Bonner, John, came here from Boston about 1690. By second w. Mary Clark, who d. here 20 April 1697, he had Jane, b. 2 May 1691, m. John Ellery of Boston, 31–Aug. 1710; John, b. 6 Dec. 1693, m. Sarah, dau. of Samuel Marsh, 17 Nov. 1715; Thomas, b. 6 Jan. 1695-6, and d. 3 June 1719; buried in South Carolina. John the f. sold his house 1705, returned to Bos., and d. 30 Jan. 1725-6, a. 83 years. An obituary represents him as a gentleman very skillful and ingenious in many arts and sciences, especially in navigation, drawing, moulding of ships, &c.; one of the best acquainted with the coasts of North America, of any of his time; of great knowledge and judgment in marine affairs; was very much consulted, impr