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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 51 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 51 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 22 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Humphrey Marshall or search for Humphrey Marshall in all documents.

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er about a rascally Indian. We have been encamped here since June, but expect to get into quarters before winter sets in. I could say a great deal more, but I am almost converted into bacon, already, by the smoke from a big log-fire before my tent. I am on guard. Yours truly, Johnston. Six companies of the First, six of the Third, and the Sixth Regiment, to which I belong, are stationed here. Plenty of sport. I am in excellent health and fine spirits. Present my respects to Marshall, Taliaferro, R. and J. Taylor, Hannegan, Green, and Beattie. Yours truly, J. Brown, in his History of Illinois (New York, 1844), says: Red Bird died in prison. A part of those arrested were convicted, and a part acquitted. Those convicted were executed on the 26th of December, in the following year (1828). Black Hawk and Kanonekan, or the Youngest of the Thunders, and a son of Red Bird, all of whom had been charged with attacking the boats, were acquitted. Black Hawk was confi
ompromise. Thus the State-rights men of Kentucky lost the leadership of the only man then able to rally them into a compact organization. Though numerous, and ready for any enterprise, no name of acknowledged authority appeared at their head. Mr. Guthrie had renounced his place with them, and was openly acting with the unconditional submissionists. The Governor, Magoffin, was unequal to the difficulties by which he was surrounded. William Preston was absent, as minister to Spain. Humphrey Marshall, and some other men of ability, were hampered by their positions in Congress. Under the circumstances, the situation seemed more in the hands of General Simon B. Buckner than of any other one man. Buckner was a native of Kentucky, and thirty-eight years of age. He was graduated at West Point, where he was subsequently an instructor in ethics and in tactics. In the Mexican War he was wounded at Churubusco, and brevetted for gallantry. After a varied service, he resigned in 1855, a
liams conducted his retreat with success; and reached Pound Gap on the 13th of November with 835 men, the rest having scattered. Here he was met by Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall, who had lately been assigned to the command of that district. Marshall had 1,600 men, 500 of them unarmed. With these troops he took position in Marshall had 1,600 men, 500 of them unarmed. With these troops he took position in observation, secure in these mountain fastnesses, but without power for an advance. It will be observed that all these events took place in the last days of October or early in November. General (then Colonel) John C. Brown informs the writer that, at this juncture, he was accompanying General Johnston on a reconnaissance, fr measures to suppress the uprising of the disaffected in Rhea and Hamilton Counties, Tennessee; and, if it is true that Williams has retreated through Pound Gap, Marshall could easily suppress the insurrection in Carter, Johnson, and other counties, and then unite his force with Zollicoffer. The force under Zollicoffer, as everyw
ed States military authorities feared greatly an immediate revolt of the State-rights party. Breckinridge was counseling the people, but with his usual prudence, to organize against encroachments on their State-rights. William Preston and Humphrey Marshall, with more vehemence, were urging them to measures of resistance. Southern sympathizers everywhere denounced the fraud which had been practised in the name of neutrality. A dangerous excitement existed, which, if left longer, might have pn the free States. On the same day, September 19th, Colonel Bramlette, with his command, reached Lexington, to arrest Breckinridge, Preston, and other Southern-rights men. But these received timely intimation of their danger, and escaped. Humphrey Marshall, George B. Hodge, John S. Williams, Haldeman and McKee, of the Courier, and many other Southern sympathizers, warned by these events, or by secret friendly messages, also found their way to the Confederate lines. These fugitives resorte
gan again. General Johnston had requested Marshall to send him a regiment, but Marshall replied Marshall replied that to send him a single man was to risk the ruin of his whole command; so that the matter was dropr 350 pounds, unfitted him for the field. Marshall moved forward to Paintsville, on the Big Sand people were generally hostile to the South. Marshall's force, when he reached Paintsville, was 2,2 with the enemy. About the same time that Marshall advanced into Kentucky, Buell organized an excavalry, advanced from Mount Sterling to take Marshall in the rear. To avoid this danger, Marshall Marshall fell back some fifteen miles, and took position on Middle Creek, near Prestonburg. On the 3d of Jan the 9th of January Garfield advanced against Marshall's position at Prestonburg, and on the next day. He says: At half-past 4 o'clock he (Marshall) ordered a retreat. My men drove him down thave fallen back fifteen miles to Paintsville; Marshall, seven miles, where he remained two days at t[9 more...]