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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 51 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 51 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 22 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Humphrey Marshall or search for Humphrey Marshall in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 83.-skirmish at Baton Rouge, La. (search)
ashing across the bridge with the reserve. Seeing this, the enemy fled precipitately under our fire. The Captain's arrival was well timed, for every man with me had discharged his shots. Six of us fired over thirty shots. Our loss was Sergeant Marshall, wounded in the thigh, badly, and one horse killed. The enemy's loss is not certainly known, but was at least four killed, seven prisoners, twenty horses, three mules, and a wagon laden with provisions and forage, besides a quantity of arm attacked first by the enemy, and also for his coolness during the time we were under fire at night, and for his efforts in allaying the panic which for a moment prevailed among some of his men at that time. Too much credit cannot be given Sergeants Marshall and Parsons, private Miller, and Sergeant Brown for their courage and brave conduct in receiving the two volleys in the camp of the enemy, and their subsequent conduct that night. Trusting that my action in the premises may meet your appro
President to declare, on or before the first day of July then next following, by his proclamation, in what States and parts of States insurrection exists: Now, therefore, be it known that I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that the States of South-Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennessee, North-Carolina, and the State of Virginia, except the following counties, Hancock, Brooke, Ohio, Marshall, Wetzel, Marion, Monongalia, Preston, Taylor, Pleasants, Tyler, Ritchie, Doddridge, Harrison, Wood, Jackson, Wirt, Roane, Calhoun, Gilmer, Barbour, Tucker, Lewis, Braxton, Upshur, Randolph, Mason, Putnam, Kanawha, Clay, Nicholas, Cabell, Wayne, Boone, Logan, Wyoming, Webster, Fayette, and Raleigh, are now in insurrection and rebellion, and by reason thereof the civil authority of the United States is obstructed so that the provisions of the Act to provide increased revenue from imports to p
sed up command. Generals Augur and Geary wounded. Major Armstrong and Adjutant Marshall, and all but five of the line-officers of the Fifth Ohio wounded. Col. Cs of Lee, Wise, Buchanan, McDowell and Wyoming, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall; and I do proclaim the suspension of all civil jurisdiction, (with tr one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. Jefferson Davis. 2. Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall is charged with the due execution of the foregoing proclamation. Hewhom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Dougerro, Fields, Jenkins, and Mahone, have been reported wounded; Colonels Means, Marshall, Baylor, Neff, and Gadberry killed. About seven thousand prisoners have alread a very painful wound during the engagement. The conduct of Lieuts. Swigart, Marshall, and Burrell, throughout the entire fight, was highly commendable, and exhibit
their own comrades were falling all around them. They seemed to take no notice of the leaden hail showering around them, but continued onward in pursuit of the enemy until every cartridge-box was emptied, and nearly every field and line-officer was stricken with the leaden messengers. No support advancing to their cover, they again fell back out of the range of the enemy's artillery, and retired, a pretty much used up command. Generals Augur and Geary wounded. Major Armstrong and Adjutant Marshall, and all but five of the line-officers of the Fifth Ohio wounded. Col. Creighton wounded, and the same ratio of line — officers of the Seventh Ohio killed or wounded, with not uninjured men enough left to bear off the wounded from the field, without the attempt to move the killed. Oh! it made my blood run cold to see these regiments, who have so recently been obliged to face the foe in several hard-fought engagements until they numbered but a handful of effective men, again necessita
e of the writ of habeas corpus, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, do proclaim that martial law is hereby extended over the counties of Lee, Wise, Buchanan, McDowell and Wyoming, under the command of Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall; and I do proclaim the suspension of all civil jurisdiction, (with the exception of that enabling the courts to take cognizance of the probate of wills, the administration of the estates of deceased persons, the qualification of guardinsion of the writ of habeas corpus in the counties aforesaid. In faith whereof I have hereunto signed my name and set my seal, this the third day of May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two. Jefferson Davis. 2. Brig.-Gen. Humphrey Marshall is charged with the due execution of the foregoing proclamation. He will forthwith establish an efficient military police, and will enforce the following orders: All distillation of spirituous liquors is positively prohibited,
tillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom met my hearty approval and merits high commendation: Cols. Macomb, Clary, Marshall, Butler, Morgan, and Welch; Majors Selfridge and Meline; Captains Archer, Douglas Pope, Haight, Atcheson, De Kay, Piatt, Paine, Strother. Mr. McCain, confidential telegraph operator at my headquarters, accompanied me throughout the campaign, ancial reports of our loss or captured in these various engagements. Many gallant officers have been killed or wounded. Of the general officers, Ewell, Trimble, Taliaferro, Fields, Jenkins, and Mahone, have been reported wounded; Colonels Means, Marshall, Baylor, Neff, and Gadberry killed. About seven thousand prisoners have already been paroled; about the same number of small arms collected from the field, and thirty pieces of cannon captured, besides a number of wagons, ambulances, etc. A lar
ed while gallantly leading their commands. Where every officer and man behaved with such signal bravery and coolness, it would be invidious to make distinction by mentioning names of a part only. I cannot speak in too high praise of the officers of my staff, to whom I am indebted for valuable services rendered to me on the field. My Adjutant-General, Capt. E. D. Mason, behaved with great coolness, and received a very painful wound during the engagement. The conduct of Lieuts. Swigart, Marshall, and Burrell, throughout the entire fight, was highly commendable, and exhibited a high degree of gallantry, efficiency, and personal bravery. They were proved by a test such as it is seldom the lot even of veterans to encounter, and the result has been highly honorable to them. I recommend them to the consideration of the Commanding General. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Nathan Kimball, Brig.-General Commanding First Brigade. To Brig.-Gen. French, Commandin