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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 51 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 51 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 22 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Humphrey Marshall or search for Humphrey Marshall in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
Mr. Madison, who had been one of the most prominent in framing the Constitution, had used this language, The States being parties to the compact and in their sovereign capacity, it follows of necessity that there can be no tribunal above their authority to decide in the last resort whether the compact made by them be violated, and consequently that, as parties to it, they must decide in the last resort such questions as may be of sufficient magnitude to require their interpretation. Chief Justice Marshall, who was a Federalist and neither personally nor politically in sympathy with Mr. Jefferson, in rendering a judicial decision in an important case said: In America the powers of sovereignty are divided between the government of the Union and those of the States. They are each sovereign with respect to the objects committed to the other. If it be true that the Constitution and laws of the land made in pursuance thereof are the supreme law of the land, it is equally true that laws of
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
Morgan, of Lexington, evaded the vigilance of the Federal forces and left that place for the South, with a small body of mounted men which became the nucleus of his celebrated command. He had served in the Mexican war when barely of age, in General Marshall's cavalry regiment, and had come out of it a lieutenant. When the present crisis came, he was quietly engaged as a manufacturer of hemp. For several years previous he had been captain of the Lexington Rifles, an organization which he made iams in his report gives his casualties as 10 killed and 15 wounded and the enemy's loss at over 300, while General Nelson gives the Confederate loss as 32 killed and his own as 6 killed and 24 wounded. Colonel Williams in his report to General Humphrey Marshall, who on the 1st of November had been assigned to the command of that district, with headquarters at Abingdon, Va., reporting to Gen. A. S. Johnston, speaks of his command as an unorganized and half armed, barefooted squad. The Fifth
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
t results both to the people of the State and to the Confederacy; and we would therefore most respectfully suggest and recommend that as many of the officers and soldiers from Kentucky in the service as can be spared for the purpose with a due regard to other exigencies and interests, should be temporarily withdrawn from other duty and attached to the army entering that State. We would therefore respectfully suggest that Major-General Breckinridge, with his division generals, Buckner and Marshall, be sent to Kentucky. We have the honor to be very respectfully, Your obedient servants, John W. Crockett, Geo. W. Ewing, H. C. Burnett, R. J. Breckinridge, E. M. Bruce, Henry E. Read, W. E. Simms, W. B. Machen, Geo. B. Hodge, James S. Chrisman. President Davis, on receipt of this letter, renewed his order already given directing that General Breckinridge should accompany the movement. A few days later General Hardee sent him the following dispatch: Chattanooga,
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
e until in progress two hours Bragg Falls back to Harrodsburg army concentrated but Fails to attack beginning of retreat from Kentucky Bryantsville General Humphrey Marshall For reasons unnecessary to consider here, but which caused a long and embittered controversy, the attack was not made as expected, and General Bragg, ion, the council with one exception, concurred in the propriety of a retreat through Cumberland Gap while the route was open and the roads were yet good. Gen. Humphrey Marshall, who simultaneously with General Bragg's advance into Kentucky had come through Pound Gap from southwestern Virginia, with several thousand cavalry, favorhester, Beattyville and West Liberty to Greenup on the Ohio, where he had arrived on the 3rd of October. His progress was impeded somewhat by the cavalry of General Marshall and Col. John H. Morgan, but the nature of the country not being favorable for cavalry operations, their resistance availed but little beyond preventing his
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
ntucky regiment, recruited and reorganized by Col. J. Russell Butler, was temporarily assigned to Colonel Scott's brigade. A number of other inchoate regiments came out, which, if the occupation of Kentucky had lasted awhile longer, would have all been filled; but as it was, those under Col. D. Howard Smith, the Fifth; Col. J. Warren Grigsby, Sixth, and Col. Adam R. Johnson, Tenth, were soon available and made valuable accessions to the command a little later in middle Tennessee. With General Marshall also went out of Kentucky into Virginia a number of organizations, some of them regiments and others battalions, which did valuable service during the remainder of the war. Among these were the Fifth infantry, Gen. John S. Williams' original regiment, whose time had expired, but which was recruited and reorganized by Col. Hiram Hawkins; the Fourth Kentucky cavalry, Col. Henry L. Giltner; Eleventh Kentucky mounted infantry, known also as the Thirteenth regiment Kentucky cavalry, Col. Ben
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
reinforce the Confederate army at Jackson and to take command, but was too late to save the position, and applied for reinforcements. On the 24th, General Breckinridge with his division was ordered to that point. Colonel Hunt of the Fifth, whose family had been sent through the lines from Kentucky, was compelled to resign, and was succeeded by Lieut.-Col. J. W. Caldwell. General Preston was in May ordered to the command of the department of Southwestern Virginia, to succeed Gen. Humphrey Marshall, and about the same time General Buckner was transferred from Mobile to command the department of East Tennessee. With the departure of General Breckinridge on the 25th there were no Kentucky troops left in Tennessee except the cavalry. Upon the arrival of his division in Mississippi, June 1st, the enemy had evacuated Jackson, and General Breckinridge was placed in command at that place. His division was now composed of Adams', Evans', Stovall's and Helm's brigades, the Forty-seventh G
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
ted the fact that Kentucky was peopled more directly by persons of pure English blood and had less proportion of foreign born population than any other State in the Union, the statistics of the eleventh census showing less than sixty thousand out of a total of nearly two millions. He then says on the subject under consideration: The rebel exiles who braved all consequences and forced their way through the lines to form Morgan's cavalry, the First brigade of infantry, the commands of Marshall and others, and the earliest volunteer Federal regiments, were probably the superior element of these Kentucky contributions to the war. They were the first runnings of the press, and naturally had the peculiar quality of their vintage more clearly marked than the later product, when the mass became more turgid with conscripts, substitutes and bounty volunteers. Had the measurements and classified results applied only to the representative native element, the standard of average of manhood
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix A. (search)
isville chancery court, 1874-80, while Geo. B. Hodge and Robert J. Breckinridge served as State senators, and James S. Chrisman as representative. In 1863 the following were elected and sent as members of the second permanent Congress: First district, Willis B. Machen; Second district, Geo. W. Triplett: Third district, Henry E. Read; Fourth district, Geo. W. Ewing; Fifth district, Jas. S. Chrisman; Sixth district, Theodore L. Burnett; Seventh district, H. W. Bruce; Eighth district, Humphrey Marshall; Ninth district, E. M. Bruce; Tenth district, James W. Moore; Eleventh district, Ben. F. Bradley; Twelfth district, John M. Elliott. Mr. Bradley afterwards served as State senator. The legislative council, upon the admission of the State, elected Henry C. Burnett and William E. Simms senators to the Confederate Congress, and they served through the war. Upon the death of Gov. George W. Johnson, who fell on the second day at Shiloh, while fighting in the ranks, the legislative counci
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
t of his command marched to the assistance of Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky, while D warden of the penitentiary. Brigadier-General Humphrey Marshall Brigadier-General Humphrey Mwyer and jurist, and his grandfather was Humphrey Marshall, the statesman. He was born in Frankforice of the regiment expired July 7, 1847. Colonel Marshall then returned to his farm in Kentucky. Hloyd county. A severe combat ensued in which Marshall repulsed every attack, but many of his men hal a vacancy caused by the resignation of Humphrey Marshall, and continued to represent his State unarch 3, 1855, when he surrendered his seat to Marshall, elected the previous autumn as candidate of 28, 1863, he was ordered to relieve General Humphrey Marshall in southwest Virginia and east Tenned as brigadier-general. He served under Humphrey Marshall in eastern Kentucky and southwest Virginia. After the removal of General Marshall to another field of operations General Williams remained [1 more...]