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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 61 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 28 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Marshall or search for John Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.5 (search)
sh earth in front. His command were ordered to crouch down carefully concealed until the enemy should arrive at point blank. Then at the word they would rise, take good aim and fire. The rest of the command was held in reserve, under Colonel Flournoy, on the right bank of the river, where field-works had long ago been constructed upon the bluff some twenty feet above the bridge. This work was armed with four six-pounders, which were worked upon the advancing enemy under command of Captain Marshall. Two hundred and fifty against two thousand five hundred. During the morning of the 24th Wilson arrived upon the ridge, about one mile from the bridge. He fixed his headquarters in the lawn of Mr. McPhail's house, whence he could view the field of battle and all its approaches, and convinced that he would encounter stout resistance he made his preparations accordingly. About 4 P. M. he moved two thousand five hundred dismounted riflemen under a brigade commander to make the a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Another account of the fight. (search)
boys in the battle. Account of Captain J. W. Lewis. [times, October 11, 1891] My attention has been called to the account of that glorious battle of 24th June, 1864, at Staunton bridge. I am glad that General D. H. Maury and Major John B. McPhail have given so interesting an account of it. But you will see that both accounts only refer to the fight on the lower or eastern side of the bridge. We had six pieces of artillery, four on the lower side of the bridge, commanded by Captain Marshall and Lieutenant Bob Ragland. The two on the upper or western side of the bridge Major Farinholt, who commanded the guard stationed there, gave to me, I being captain of artillery. The two guns were stationed one hundred yards above the bridge. When I took command of these guns and examined the amunition I found that we had only solid shot and canister. The upper side of the bridge. We at once covered the works with green bushes. General Wilson threw his troops on both sides of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
men ever were. It had gotten down to mere hand-to-hand fighting of small squads, out in the open and in the pines. There was no relief, no reinforcements, no fresh troops to come, or to fall back on. Luckily the enemy were in the same disorganized condition as we were. General Johnston seized the colors of a regiment, and on horseback, led a charge, excusing it afterwards as necessary at that moment to make a personal example. Our Colonel Jackson, with only two aids, Colonels Jones and Marshall, both subsequently killed, rode slowly, and without the slightest hurrah, frequently along our front, encouraging us by his quiet presence. He held aloft his left or bridle hand, looking as if he was invoking a blessing, as many supposed, but in fact to ease the intense pain, for a bullet had badly shattered two of his fingers, to which he never alluded, and it has been forgotten, for it was the only time he was ever wounded, until his fall in action in 863. Thus the fate of the field hun
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ly it seems, other Virginian precursors of enlightenment. The original title of a dignified body, which I have for years striven to serve, was the Virginia Historical and Philosophical Society. It was organized December 29, 1831, with Chief-Justice Marshall as its first president. It is honored now in a triumvirate of directive officers, whom Richmond values for their excellences. The second of these is your own loved president, the chief herald of the cause of education in our teeming repof the seventeenth century was the ancestor in common of three of the most eminent men that America has produced in quite a century and a half. William Randolph, of Turkey Island, was the grandfather, in varying degrees, of Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall and Robert Edward Lee. This may be accounted by the enthusiastic disciple of Galton as a confirmation in three-fold exemplification of the law of heredity when it is recalled that William Randolph was of that resolution of character that broo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
entlemen and their commands did most efficient service, neither of them were immediately present while the battle was being fought. Your report of it, after giving Colonel Coleman the credit of preparing the defences on the north and east side of the river and commanding those forces, says the rest of the command was held in reserve under Colonel Flournoy on the right bank of the river. This work was armed with four six-pounders, which were worked upon the enemy under the command of Captain Marshall. A gallant Virginian. Colonel Flournoy was a gentleman sans peur et sans reproche, and as he, by special invitation, on two occasions (once at his own house and once at the house of his neighbor, Mr. Clarke), soon after this engagement met me and assisted in entertaining me as a compliment for the most gallant defence, as he pleased to term it, made of Staunton river bridge, his home and household goods, I cannot think for a moment Colonel Flournoy would have related to you that h