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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 61 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 55 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 35 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 28 2 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 24 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John Marshall or search for John Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
holas, Edmund Pendleton, James Madison and John Marshall. The opponents were Patrick Henry, George of the Mississippi. Henry declared, says John Marshall, he would rather part with the confederatihe cornerstone of Mason's Hall in 1785. John Marshall. The poet has drawn the following pictuin his mind's eye, he could not have drawn John Marshall more truly than in the above lines. When d in snow by the blood on their feet. When Marshall declared himself a candidate for the Conventinly dressed countryman was was told he was Judge Marshall, Chief Justice of the United States. JudgeJudge Marshall was an enthusiastic Mason and was Grand Master of Masons in Virginia in 1793, and a memberperplex and dash Maturest counsels. Chief Justice Marshall, who was the chief of the opposition, Monroe. Attended a country school with John Marshall, with whom he traveled his eventful careerhis classic reasoning and harmonious periods; Marshall with his simple and unassuming manners, but w[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
Monroe after he left the White House. There is no part of the country, said John Marshall in 1830, where less of disquiet and less of ill-feeling between man and manestly is more than to misgovern widely. The convention of 1829-30, in which Marshall's words were spoken, was the arena of contest between sections having, as theyey who bore rule, bore the burden of rule. The social structure extolled by Marshall was a freedom which bound citizen to citizen by stronger ties than those of fo a Commonwealth. It was a simple and a grand old day when, in this city, John Marshall might have been seen each morning wending his way to the Old market, accomptremes of wealth and poverty; between capital and labor. The interval between Marshall and Marshall's Jack; Wickham and Wickham's Bob, was spanned by a bridge restinMarshall's Jack; Wickham and Wickham's Bob, was spanned by a bridge resting on the two great pillars of reverence and sympathy. On these two is laid that structure of law and prophets which binds the State together. When the discussion wa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
, 23 Keysville Guards, 146 Roll of, 147 King, Col. H. H., 167 Lassiter, Charles T., Address of, 126 Lee, Gen. R. E. At Appomattox, 15 His self-denying greatness, 294 The quintessence of Virginia, 294 When a private soldier seized his bridle, 204 Lincoln, Abraham, His kindly feeling toward the South, 254 Emancipation Proclamation of, 60 McLaws, Gen. L., 24 Madison, James, small of stature, 47 Magistrates, The, of Virginia, 303 Mahone Gen. Wm., 171 prowess of, 174 Marshall, John, Sketch of, 45 His unaffected bearing, 309 Marye's Heights, Storming of, 175 Fearful mortality at, 176, 198 Mason, Geo., Sketch of, 50 Memorable Challenge, A, 304 Memphis, Capture of by Forrest, 180 Minor, Benj. Blake, 370 Moffett, W. L., 14th Va. Cavalry, 16 Monroe James Sketch of, 52 Moore, J. Staunton, 28 Moore Surgeon General S. P., 87 Mortality in Confederate and Federal Prisons, Contrasted and Explained, 226 Morton Howard, on dauntless charge of V. M. I.