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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. (search)
ed on upon the track of the enemy toward Warrenton, followed by the infantry, who had witnessed the feats of their cavalry brethren with all the satisfaction of outside spectators. In Jeffersonton and at Warrenton Springs many brave fellows had fallen, and sad scenes were presented. Lieutenant Chew had fought from house to house in the first named place, and in a mansion of the village this gallant officer lay dying, with a bullet through his breast. At Mr. M—‘s, near the river, young Marshall, of Fauquier, a descendant of the Chief Justice, was lying on a table, covered with a sheet-dead, with a huge, bloody hole in the centre of his pale forehead; while in a bed opposite lay a wounded Federal officer. In the fields around were dead men, dead horses, and abandoned arms. The army pushed on to Warrenton, the cavalry still in advance, and on the evening of the next day Stuart rapidly advanced with his column to reconnoitre toward Catlett's Station, the scene of his great raid
ted to Fourth Corporal for it. I will therefore say of General Lee that, to my thinking, his character bears the most striking and surprising resemblance to that of General Washington. When I say this, you will know my opinion of him, for I have always taught my boys to revere the name of the Father of his Country. In saying this about General Lee, I do not mean any empty compliment. It is very easy to talk about a second Washington without meaning much, but I mean what I say. I read Marshall's Life of the General some years since, and I remember taking notice of the fact that Washington appeared to be the tallest and strongest of all the great men around him. I did not see that he excelled each one of them in every particular. On the contrary, there was Patrick Henry; he could make a better speech. There was Jefferson; he could write a better State paper. And there was Alexander Hamilton, who was a much better hand at figures, and the hocus-pocus of currency and finance. (I