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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

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uke, the father of the gallant General Basil W. Duke; Captain William Smith, also of the United States Navy; Captain William Bickley, of the United States Army; Hon. John D. Taylor, well known in the politics and jurisprudence of Kentucky; Mr. Charles Marshall (known as Black Dan), Mr. John Green, and John A. McClung. Albert Sidney Johnston was endowed by nature with an ardent and enthusiastic temperament; but to this were joined a solidity of judgment and a power of self-control, that earlyare not informed. Throughout life he showed an uncommon knowledge of physiology, and acquaintance with medical practice; due in part, perhaps, to this apprenticeship, but probably still more to the informal instruction of his father. Colonel C. Marshall, writing with reference to this period of his life, says: His dignified bearing, his reserved and quiet manners, even at that time, I can recall. The influence he always possessed with the young men of his own age, and his habitual in