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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Life in Pennsylvania. (search)
the pleasure of associating in the daily walks of life. Yours, very respectfully, W. H. Taylor. To General Longstreet. The next letter is from Colonel Charles Marshall, of General Lee's staff, who has charge of all the papers left by General Lee. It is as follows: Baltimore, Md., May 7th, 1875. Dear General-Your lethe attack on the 2d was expected by him to begin earlier, except that he notices that there was not proper concert of action on that day. Respectfully, Charles Marshall. To General Longstreet, New Orleans. Then a letter from General A. S. Long, who was General Lee's Military Secretary: Big Island, Bedford, Va., May 31snrise on the 2d of July I was sent by General Lee to General Ewell to ask him what he thought of the advantages of an attack on the enemy from his position. (Colonel Marshall had been sent with a similar order on the night of the 1st.) General Ewell made me ride with him from point to point of his lines, so as to see with him the
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
se, but Lieutenant Payne and his men camped in the yard. By some unaccountable neglect, the main highway, leading past Prospect Hill from Orlean to Waterloo, and from thence to Warrenton, had not been picketed nor guarded, so that there was that night between the Confederate general and the Federal army, which lay scattered between Waterloo and Warrenton Junction, nothing but this open highway. In this exposed condition things remained for several hours, when it was discovered by Colonel Charles Marshall, the vigilant aide-de-camp of General Lee. About midnight, with consternation, he aroused Lieutenant Payne, and communicated the fact to him, and that the nearest brigade was a mile distant. With his whole force, all the roads in the direction of the enemy were picketed; but, fortunately, the enemy were not apprised of the General's exposed position, and the night passed without alarm. The next day, just before the head of the column arrived at Salem, information was brought to G