hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert. You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 1: explanation of the title-scheme of the work. (search)
der Marse Robert. Why Marse Robert? So, in Innes Randolph's inimitable song, A good old Rebel, the hero thus vaunts his brief but glorious annals: I followed old Mars' Robert For four year, near about; Got wounded in three places And starved at Pint Lookout. Again, why Marse Robert? The passion of soldiers for nicknaming their favorite leaders, re-christening them according to their unfettered fancy and their own sweet will, is well known. The little corporal, The iron Duke, Marshall forwards, Bobs, Bobs Bahadur, Little Mac, Little Phil, Fighting Joe, Stonewall, Old Jack, Old Pete, Old Jube, Jubilee, Rooney, Fitz, Marse Robert --all these and many more are familiar. There is something grotesque about most of them and in many, seemingly, rank disrespect. Yet the habit has never been regarded as a violation of military law, and the commanding general of an army, if a staunch fighter, and particularly if victory often perches on his banner, is very apt to win the noways
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 3: from New York to Richmond (search)
the noble intervention and mediation of Virginia. It made my heart glow to hear how these great financiers and merchant princes spoke of my adopted State. They said in effect, that it had always been so; that Virginia was undoubtedly the greatest and most influential of all the States; that she had been the nursing mother of the Union and of the country and would prove their preserver; that Virginians had really made the United States in the olden days,--Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Marshall,--and Virginians would save the United States to-day. They deciared that they had always worshiped the Old Dominion, and now, more than ever, for the noble position she had assumed in this crisis. How could I help glowing with pride and brightening with hope! Alas! the shriek of the first shell that burst over Sumter shattered these fair hopes-and pandemonium reigned in New York. It is not within the province of this book to discuss the responsibility for that shell. I will, howe
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 17: between Gettysburg and the Wilderness (search)
damn Yankees coming? Come, Dragon, come, Logan, we must git out oa this! 0, I wouldn't be in quite such a hurry. There is no danger yet awhile. Let them finish their breakfast. I only meant- No, sir; I ain't taking no chances. The infernal Yankees sha'n't never git my mules! Come on here, Dragon and Logan, --leading them toward the bars,--we must git out o‘ this, and mighty quick, too! As he got his pets out in the road and was hitching them up again, Colonel Taylor and Colonel Marshall and the rest of General Lee's staff rode up and reported to Tuck's friend and took orders from him, and Tuck waked up to the fact that he had been talking with Marse Robert himself for the last five minutes. Great Scott! said he, in relating his adventure, I felt that I had been more impudent than the devil himself, and I wanted to get out oa sight as fast as ever I could; but I didn't feel like letting no common man speak to me for two or three days after that. There is a delic
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
McGowan, Samuel, 57-58. McGuire, Hunter Holmes, 105, 245-46, 351 McLaws, Lafayette: described, 223; mentioned, 129, 165, 168-69, 173- 79, 182, 192, 222-24, 231, 270 Machine guns, 76-77. Magruder, John Bankhead, 75, 79-80, 94-97, 102, 107, 160 Mahone, William, 311 Malvern Hill, 41, 96-97, 101-18, 130, 146, 309 Manassas, Va.: first battle of, 41, 44- 48, 59, 111, 324; second battle of, 118-24, 191 Manly's Battery (N. C.), 154, 168, 301, 310 Marse Robert, 18-21. Marshall, Charles, 226 Mascots, 170-72. Massachusetts Infantry: 20th Regiment, 130 Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 79 Maury, Richard Launcelot, 79 Meade, George Gordon: Lee's comments on, 227-28; mentioned, 207, 222, 237, 288 Mechanicsville, Va., 93-94. Northern civilians, 200-206. Northerners in Confederate service, 37-44. Observation tower, 310 Orange County, Va., 120, 355-56. Owen, William Benton, 139-45, 176-79. Pegram, John, 110, 232-33. Pegram, William Johnson, 53, 57, 10