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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 32 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 2 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 23 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 22 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Charles Marshall or search for Charles Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
lenced. Meantime, after incomprehensible delay (usually described as at least twenty minutes), the assaulting column moved forward, in a loose manner. This was Marshall's brigade of Ledlie's division, a brigade composed of dismounted cavalry and demoralized heavy artillery (!), the whole good for nothing, over which Marshall, a Marshall, a severe, courageous man, had been put, in the vain hope of beating in some discipline! Burnside, with inconceivable fatuity, allowed the troops for leading the assault to be selected by lot! The Corps was enough run down to make it hard to get a good forlorn hope with the most careful picking. Then no gap had been made in the parwas a hitch! Colonel de Chanal, who was standing with me, was frantic over this loss of precious moments. Mais, cette perte de temps! he kept saying. In fact Marshall's brigade had gone into the crater and had filled it, and now were utterly immovable and sullen! The supports, brought up by the flank in bad order, crowded int
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
he world. I did not think, when I left, in 1863, for Germantown, that I should ever shake the hand of Robert E. Lee, prisoner of war! He held a long conference with General Meade, while I stood over a fire, with his officers, in the rain. Colonel Marshall, one of his aides, was a very sensible and gentlemanly man, and seemed in good spirits. He told me that, at one time during the retreat, he got no sleep for seventy-two hours, the consequence of which was that his brain did not work at all, or worked all wrong. A quartermaster came up to him and asked by what route he should move his train: to which Marshall replied, in a lucid manner: Tell the Captain that I should have sent that cane as a present to his baby; but I could not, because the baby turned out to be a girl instead of a boy! We were talking there together, when there appeared a great oddity — an old man, with an angular, much-wrinkled face, and long, thick white hair, brushed à la Calhoun; a pair of silver spectacles
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
thaniel, 9. McClellan, Arthur, 70, 112. McClellan, George Brinton, 141, 262. McGregor, —, 234. McKibbin, Chambers, 220. McLaughlen Napoleon Bonaparte, 261, 323. McMahon, John E., 154. McMahon, Martin Thomas, 107, 247. McParlin, Thomas Andrew, 115, 221. Macy, George Nelson, 97, 215. Madison's ordinary, 119. Mahon, Lord, see Stanhope. Mahone, William, 188. Mangohick Church, 130. Maps, difficulties of, 136. Marivault, —, de, 290. Marseilles, anecdotes of, 191. Marshall, Charles, 361. Marshall, Elisha Gaylord, 199. Martyn, steamer, 319. Marylanders, 221. Mason, Addison Gordon, 69, 122, 249. Mat, the, 121. Matile, George Auguste, 212. Matinee musicale, 317. Meade, George, 36, 48, 75, 359. Meade, George Gordon, 97, 107, 122, 338; at Key West, III; accepts Lyman as volunteer aide, 3; manner of riding, 8; at Gettysburg, 12; characteristics, 25, 38, 57, 61, 73, 123, 128, 134, 138, 148, 167, 176, 188, 225, 358; difference with Halleck, 35; visits Wa