hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 6 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 22, 1861.., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Henry Marshall or search for Henry Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

reasoning as is here assigned — the authority of Gen. Jackson's example at New Orleans, (not mentioned by the Chief-Justice,) afterwards impliedly sanctioned by Congress, who indemnified him for its exercise, and the solemn decision of the Supreme Court, before mentioned, pronounced thirteen years since, and never afterwards questioned by that or any other tribunal — rather than by the authorities relied on by the Chief-Justice, that is to say, a clearly extra-judicial observation of Chief-Justice Marshall, a mere doubt of Mr. Justice Story, an alleged doubt of Mr. Jefferson, nowhere, however, proved to have been felt, of the legality of Gen. Wilkinson's conduct at New Orleans in 1807--conduct in fact approved by him, and not disapproved of by any Congressional legislation — a commentary on the English form of government, a Government resting as to nearly all its powers upon usage and precedent, or to the otherwise unsupported authority of the Chief-Justice, and especially when, as in <
he Constitution; its simpler and yet plainer reading; the overwhelming authority of our fathers against it; the crushing weight of opinion against it in our own State-her Jefferson declaring that even the old Confederation, a Government far weaker than the present Federal Union, possessed the power of coercion — her Madison, the very father of the Constitution, solemnly asserting that its framers never for one moment contemplated so disorganizing and ruinous a principle — her great and good Marshall decreeing more than once, from the bench of the Supreme Judiciary, that the Federal Constitution did not constitute a mere compact or treaty, but a government of the whole people of the United States, with supreme powers within the sphere of its authority--Judge Spencer Roane, the Ajax Telamon, in his day, of her State-rights republicanism, endorsing the sentiment: It is treason to secede! --her Thomas Ritchie, the Napoleon of the press and Jupiter Tonans of the modern democracy, heralding
b. 9.Augustus H. Kenan. 10.Alex. H. Stephens. Louisiana. 1.John Perkins, Jr. 2.A. De Clouet. 3.Charles H. Conrad. 4.D. F. Kenner. 5.Edward Sparrow. 6.Henry Marshall. Mississippi. 1.Wiley P. Harris. 2.Walter Brooke. 3.W. S. Wilson. 4.A. M. Clayton. 5.W. S. Barry. 6.James T. Harrison. 7.J. A. P. Campbell. South Carairs.--Messrs. Chilton, Boyce, Hill, Harrison, Curry. On Patents.--Messrs. Brooke, Wilson, Lewis, Hill, Kenner. On Territories.--Messrs. Chesnut, Campbell, Marshall, Nisbet, Fearn. On Public Lands.--Messrs. Marshall, Harris, Fearn, Anderson, Wright. On Indian Affairs.--Messrs. Morton, Hale, Lewis, Keitt, Sparrow. OnMessrs. Marshall, Harris, Fearn, Anderson, Wright. On Indian Affairs.--Messrs. Morton, Hale, Lewis, Keitt, Sparrow. On Printing.--Messrs. T. R. R. Cobb, Harrison, Miles, Chilton, Perkins. On Accounts.--Messrs. Owens, DeClouet, Campbell, Smith, Crawford. On Engrossments.--Messrs. Shorter, Wilson, Kenan, McRae, Bartow Message of Jefferson Davis: delivered at Richmond July 20. Gentlemen of the Congress of the Confederate States of Am
w commenced in good earnest; types, desks, paper of all kinds, and in fact every thing which is used about a printing office, came tumbling down on to the sidewalk in a fearful manner. Bonfires were immediately kindled, and the relics of the secession press were thrown upon the burning pile, while the soldiers gathered around the smoldering ruins, and gave vent to their joy in the wildest acclamations. After the fires had somewhat abated, and nearly every thing had been consumed, the City Marshall went into the office and prevailed upon the rioters to go into the street. As I close, the excitement is intense, and diligent search is being made for those connected with the paper. It is feared their lives will be taken in case they are found. 7 o'clock P. M. Mob law is again triumphant; the soldiers discovered the hiding-places of the publishers and seized their unfortunate victims, but the citizens rescued them, and with great difficulty carried them to the police-station. Thei