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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 58 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 51 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 51 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 40 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 37 7 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 22 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Humphrey Marshall or search for Humphrey Marshall in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 1 document section:

1,900 cavalry, had proceeded up Big Sandy to Paintsville, within seven miles of the rebel camp, when they were met by a flag of truce bearing a message from Humphrey Marshall, asking if matters could not be arranged without a fight. Col. Garfield immediately replied he could offer no arrangement except either to fight or surrender unconditionally. Marshall then addressed his men, informing them that they had no alternative excepting to surrender or disband, and giving them the choice. They decided to disband, and immediately collected and not fire to all their wagons, tents, camp equipage, supplies, &c. then each man was permitted to take care of hiursuit.--They expect to capture the guns and perhaps pick up many of the living rebels. The rebels in Northeastern Kentucky, from the high estimate in which Marshall's military abilities were held, had strong hopes of success under his leadership. A sufficient Federal force will be left in this region to secure its futur