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The Mobile Register, of the sixth of January, says: We had the pleasure of a visit yesterday from Dr. Hugh Martin, of Delaware, late United States Consul at Matanzas, but who resigned that post in April last when that Government declared war upon the South and its institutions. Dr. Martin came passenger in one of the recent arrivals through the gap in Dr. Lincoln's blockade, from Havana. He is heart and soul with the South in her struggles, and goes to New-Orleans to make that his home. Dr. Martin came passenger in one of the recent arrivals through the gap in Dr. Lincoln's blockade, from Havana. He is heart and soul with the South in her struggles, and goes to New-Orleans to make that his home. A Correspondent of the Charleston Courier, writing from Richmond on the third of January, says: Some large shoe manufacturers from the South have just gone home from Richmond, impressed with the idea that shoes won't sell. So great an impetus was given to the manufacture several months ago by the knowledge that the supply was giving out, that the market is now overstocked. The confederate government has six hundred cases of army shoes on hand, over and above the demand, and the governm
upon the name of Zouave, and almost upon that of soldier, he has come to offer his sword to the cause of the Confederacy. Run the Bdockade. The Mobile Register and Advocate says: We had the pleasure of a visit yesterday from Dr. Hugh Martin, of Delaware, late U. S. Consul at Matanzas, but who resigned that post in April last when that Government declared war upon the South and its institutions. Dr. Martin came passenger on one of the recent arrivals through the gaps in Dr. LinDr. Martin came passenger on one of the recent arrivals through the gaps in Dr. Lincoln's blockade from Havana. He is heart and soul with the South in her struggles, and goes to New Orleans to make that his home. Message of the Governor of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, Jan. 8. --The message of the Governor of Pennsylvania to the Legislature to-day has been received. It shows a balance in the Treasury of $51,000 on the 30th of November, including $606,000 received from the United States on account of the war expenses. After reciting the facts relative to the
t. came in, in eleven days from Mobile, the Confederate schooner Smith Townsend, sixty-nine tons, with cotton; and on the 27th sailed for Matamoros (?) the Confederate schooner Wide Awake, Capt. Martin, carrying Mr. Yancey. He has been exciting some curiosity here by his long, light hair. This he had cropped and otherwise disguised. He has tried to run the blockade, for no one believes he is going to Matamoros. This schooner has run the blockade several times. Once she carried over Dr. Hugh Martin, (brother of the Captain,) our former Consul at Matamoros. The schooner Charlotte has also sailed for Matanzas; she goes under the English flag. Yesterday came in C. P. Knapp, bringing the Captain of the English steamer Labaun, whose departure from this port some time since I wrote you of as being under suspicious circumstances. I was told that she intended to evade the blockade; but, not being able to ascertain the truth, I did not say so. The Captain has protested before the Englis