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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, Fort (search)
Johnson, Fort A former protective work on the Cape Fear River, near Wilmington, N. C. On June 14, 1775, the royal governor, Joseph Martin, took refuge in the fort, as the indignant people had begun to rise in rebellion against royal rule. From that stronghold he sent forth a menacing proclamation, and soon afterwards preparations for a servile insurrection were discovered. The rumor went abroad that Martin had incited the slaves. The exasperated people determined to drive him from the fort and demolish it. A body of 500 men, led by John Ashe and Cornelius Harnett, marched to the fort. Martin had fled on board a British vessel of war in the river. from the fort and demolish it. A body of 500 men, led by John Ashe and Cornelius Harnett, marched to the fort. Martin had fled on board a British vessel of war in the river. The munitions of war had all been removed on board of a transport, and the garrison also had fled. The people burned the barracks and demolished the walls.
Yankee raid into Hardy. --On Tuesday of last week forty-two Yankee cavalry, from Romney, under command of a Captain Greenfield, came into Moorefield and mortally wounded a member of Captain Harness' company, named Joseph Martin, of Hardy county, who was in town at the time. They captured and took off two prisoners, one Mr. Dyer, of Missouri, and Mr. Shearer, of Frederick county, and five horses and one mule. The Yankees staid in Moorefield only about an hour. Martin, who was killed in into Moorefield and mortally wounded a member of Captain Harness' company, named Joseph Martin, of Hardy county, who was in town at the time. They captured and took off two prisoners, one Mr. Dyer, of Missouri, and Mr. Shearer, of Frederick county, and five horses and one mule. The Yankees staid in Moorefield only about an hour. Martin, who was killed in this raid, is represented as an excellent soldier and a brave man. He leaves a family to mourn over his death.--Rockingham Register, 5th.
S. C. R. H. Wright, 23rd Va; J. N. Mallory, 18th Tenn., a R. Mortan, 23d S. C., Morria, 14th Tenn; Dickinson, 12th S. C. H. H. Everett, 14th Texas; Lieuts W. Hark reacher, 7th Tenn. M. V. Shockley, 24th Va; A. F. Baton, 1st Tenn; C. A. Carter, 24th Va; A. J. Nowell, 1st. Tenn; M. C. Holmes, 4th Tenn; R. E. Stanten, 14th M. V. Darvin, 12th S. C., J. W. Smith, 15th Ga; J. W.--14th Tenn; Jas May, J W. Bean, 12th Va., Fm. Walen R. A. Baker, 1st S. C; Guice, 4th Ala; J. Burch, Ga., Quartermaster Jos. Martin, 6th S. C., Contemplated Exchange of State prisoners. An order of the United States Government directs all prisoners of State now on parole by authority from the headquarters of the Military District of Columbia to report in person forthwith to the Military Governor the that District. This is with a view to their exchange for Union prisoners at Richmond. The New York Herald has the following characteristic paragraph in connection with this subject: One of the volunt
The Daily Dispatch: October 6, 1862., [Electronic resource], Confederate account of the battle of Lukas. (search)
oached our outpost. Heavy skirmishing ensued. At 3 o'clock Gen. Price ordered up the 4th brigade. When they reached their position they found the enemy in line of battle holding a good position on a hill. The order was given to charge them, which charge drove the enemy back two hundred yards into a ditch formed by the road from Fulton to Eastport, and directly under their cannon, which were masked. Gen. Price had now reached the field. The firing had almost ceased. Gen. Herbert and Col. Martin, commanding brigades with Whitfield's Legion, being all the force in line. Gen. Price ordered up Gens. Gregg's and Green's brigades, to form on the left, charge the enemy and press them down on Gen. Murey's division, he being on the right. Before the arrival of their brigades, Gen. Price ascertained that the enemy were lying in the road, sheltered from our artillery. They were firing but one gun, and that on our right. The gallant and lamented Gen. Little suggested that as the
ed 300 of his men who were best mounted, and about eleven miles this side of Gadsden, near Turkeytown, he came up with the entire force of the enemy in ambush near night. He ordered an immediate charge, which he headed. The General says that every one of his jaded horses seemed animated with new life, and came up to the work like fresh animals. He says he never saw any thing like it. Here Col. Hathaway, the favorite officer of the Yankees, was killed — it is thought by a private named Joseph Martin, a mere youth, of Company G, Biffle's regiment, with an Enfield rifle, at the distance of 600 yards. This was a severe loss to the Yankees, and did much to dishearten them. Several of their best men were here killed and wounded. Forrest lost two of his gallant men: Privates Hunt, of Starnes's, and Roach, of Biffle's regiments. This battle was on Mr. Blount's farm, and the Yanks, it is supposed, in spite for the loss of one of their favorite Colonel, burnt his gin-house, stables, cribs
Garroting. --Last Sunday night an effort was made to garrote Mr. Jos. Martin as he was passing along Cary street, near 6th, by two ruffians who had dogged him several squares; but proved unsuccessful, as he knocked one of them down when the attack was made, and frightened the other off by brandishing an unloaded pistol. Mr. M. thinks he will recognize the parties when he sees them.
Latest from Knoxville. --Gen. Longstreet is still crowding the enemy towards Knoxville, as also towards another important point. The Bristol Gazette, of the 11th, obtains the following items from Capt. Kain, who gathers them from persons just from and near Knoxville: The Federals are again exercising their cruelly to the defenceless citizens. Among the recent arrests are the Rev. Jos. Martin, Chas. M. McGhee, Columbus Powell, and R. M. McPherson. They are all confined in jail. The purpose of this arrest is, without doubt, to afford their plundering bands a better opportunity to despoil the sufferers of all their portable property. Messrs McGhee and Powell, it will be recollected, was sometime since arrested under orders from General Burnside and transported to Kentucky, where, after being robbed of several thousand dollars, they were discharged, and permitted to return to their homes. The Yankees have completed the Knoxville and Kentucky Railroad to the Clinch ri
The Daily Dispatch: February 15, 1864., [Electronic resource], The Capture by Gen. Martin's expedition. (search)
The Capture by Gen. Martin's expedition. --When the attack was made on Newbern an expedition was sent out from Wilmington, under Gen. Martin, to make a demonstration against Fort Anderson. A letter in the Wilmington Journal gives the results of the expedition: Altogether, our troops captured seven pieces of artillery, several hundred stand of arms, two hundred boxes of ammunition, about seventy five prisoners, six slaves, a dozen horses, and commissary stores enough to subsist the Gen. Martin, to make a demonstration against Fort Anderson. A letter in the Wilmington Journal gives the results of the expedition: Altogether, our troops captured seven pieces of artillery, several hundred stand of arms, two hundred boxes of ammunition, about seventy five prisoners, six slaves, a dozen horses, and commissary stores enough to subsist the troops during their stay in the neighborhood, besides a large quantity of clothing with which our men supplied themselves — such as overcoats, pants, blankets, &c. The enemy burnt most of their quartermaster and commissary stores. They also burnt their stables with the horses in them. Some few horses were rescued by our men. In addition to our captures, we destroyed one thousand barrels of turpentine belonging to the U S government and burnt two railroad bridges.