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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 3 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 3 1 Browse Search
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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
ty of the Southern Methodist Church report favorably as to the fruit of their labors in the hospital. Rev. J. E. McSparran reports four conversions in the hospitals at Lynchburg, and many seriously and anxiously inquiring the way of life. Rev. J. E. Martin reports sixteen conversions in the Chimborazo Hospital, Richmond. He has found only twelve men who could not read, and they were mostly foreigners. One young man was very anxious to learn to read. I procured a spelling-book, and in a fewrst came into the hospital I was sad and dissatisfied, but since I have been here I have learned of Jesus, and thank God even for tribulations. There is great need of Testaments, as many are destitute of them. . . . A. E. Dickinson. Rev. Joseph E. Martin, from Chimborazo Hospital at Richmond, writes: We have had lately sixteen conversions. One young man was very anxious to learn to read. I procured him a spelling-book, and in a few days he learned so rapidly as to be able to read the Te
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
the week; that Brother Wiatt has baptized seventy-two up to this time; that 185 have professed religion; that the exercises throughout have been characterized by deep heart excitement, without any noise or confusion; that I expect to return in eight or ten days; that I fondly hope that many others will be converted; and that I am still yours affectionately, A. Broaddus. Kingston, North Carolina, July 28. I am now assisting the chaplain of the Forty-second North Carolina Regiment, General Martin's Brigade, in a series of meetings every night when the weather permits. The congregations are very large and attentive. Many come forward and ask God's people to pray for them. I am very much pleased with my new field of labor thus far. The soldiers appreciate kindness. G. W. Camp. By the first of August General Lee's army was camped along the line of the Rapidan (from Liberty Mills, above Orange Court House, to Raccoon Ford, below), and God blessed us with seasons of refreshing
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
es). No list obtainable. Post-chaplains at Petersburg. Rev. Thomas Hume, Jr.; Rev. W. M. Young; Rev. J. B. Hardwicke; Rev. T. Hume, Sr.; Rev. L. C. Vass; and the pastors of the different churches, and a number of visiting ministers, missionaries, and colporteurs rendered invaluable service. Post-chaplains at Richmond. These, so far as I can obtain the list, were: Rev. Dr. James B. Taylor, Sr.; Rev. Robert Ryland, D. D.; Rev. Wm. Harrison Williams; Rev. Dr. W. W. Bennett; Rev. J. E. Martin, and Rev. J. T. Carpenter. The pastors of Richmond were practically chaplains all through the war, and were untiring in their self-sacrificing labors. I recall the following: Rev. Dr. J. L. Burrows, of the First Baptist Church; Rev. Dr. J. B. Jeter, of the Grace Street Baptist Church; Rev. Dr. D. Shaver, and Rev. Dr. L. W. Seeley, of the Second Baptist Church; Rev. Dr. J. B. Solomon, of Leigh Street Baptist Church; Rev. Dr. M. D. Hoge, of the Second Presbyterian Church; Rev. Dr. T.