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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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3.  Col. Jno. H. Savage   17thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. T. W. Newman   18thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. B. Palmer Promoted Brigadier-General. 19thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Francis M. WalkerMay 8, 1862.  20thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. B. SmithMay 8, 1862.  Col. Jael A. Barth   21stTennesseeRegimentInfantryEdw'd Pickett, Jr   22dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. A. T. Robertson   Col. Thos. J. Freeman   23dTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. R. H. KeebleDec. 16, 1862.  Col. Matt. Martin   24thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. A. WilsonJan. 4, 1863.  Col. R. D. Allison   25thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Jno. M. HughesJuly 21, 1862.  Col. S. S. Stanton   26thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. M. LillardSept. 6, 1862.  27thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. A. W. CaldwellMay 15, 1862.  Col. C. H. Williams   28thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. P. Murray   29thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. Samuel Powell   30thTennesseeRegimentInfantryCol. J. W
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
rted. At Fort Moultrie the flagstaff was shot away, and falling, mortally wounded Private Lusty, Company F. Private Joseph Harrison, Company G, lost a finger, but after having his wound dressed, returned to his gun. Both these gallant men were of Colonel Butler's regiment. At Battery Wagner there were 8 casualties, 3 killed and 5 wounded, by the explosion of an ammunition chest. Sergt. G. W. Langley and Privates Amos Fitzgerald and Jerry Dyer were killed, and Lieut. G. E. Steedman, Corp. Matthew Martin and Privates Samuel Red, Marion Quillan and Thomas Prince were wounded. Total casualties, 4 killed and 11 wounded. Fort Sumter suffered some damage, but none of a serious nature. The other forts were entirely unhurt. At Sumter an 8-inch columbiad burst, a 42-pounder rifled gun was dismounted by recoil, and a 10-inch gun was dismounted by having part of its carriage shot away. The walls of the fort were not materially damaged. Fifty-five shot struck the east and northeast faces, d
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
giments, and was well sustained by the Georgians and Mississippians. The conduct of Captain Hoskins' battery was beyond praise. But for the service of his four guns, the position could not have been held two hours against the attack of the Federal division. Writing to General Beauregard from Canton, on the 25th of May, General Gist said: None of the troops from your department reached Jackson in time for the affair at Raymond, and only two regiments of Gen. W. H. T. Walker's brigade, Martin's battery, Twenty-fourth South Carolina, five companies of the Forty-sixth Georgia, and Eighth Georgia battalion arrived in time to participate in the skirmish and evacuation of the city. I got within 6 miles, and was ordered back by General Johnston with remainder of Walker's and my own brigade. . . . The only troops of my brigade engaged at Jackson were those mentioned above, and all officers join in awarding them highest praise for soldierly conduct and gallantry. The Twenty-fourth regi