Your search returned 203 results in 58 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
vision. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder: 2d Va., Col. J. W. Alien; 4th Va., Col. Charles A. Ronald; 5th Va., Col. W. S. H. Baylor, Lieut.-Col. J. H. S. Funk; 27th Va., Col. A. J. Grigsby; 33d Va., Col. John F. Neff. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 10; w, 27-37. Port Republic, k, 13; w, 154; m, 32==199. Second Brigade, Col. J. A. Campbell (w), Col. John M. Patton: 21st Va., Col. John M. Patton, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (w), Capt. John E. Penn, Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Captain Samuel Hale (w), Maj. J. B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 14 == 16. Cross Keys and Port Republic, k, 4; w, 16 == 20. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Col. A. G. Taliaferro, Lieut.-Col. George W. Curtis; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson. Brigade loss
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate Army. (search)
vision. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Winder: 2d Va., Col. J. W. Alien; 4th Va., Col. Charles A. Ronald; 5th Va., Col. W. S. H. Baylor, Lieut.-Col. J. H. S. Funk; 27th Va., Col. A. J. Grigsby; 33d Va., Col. John F. Neff. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 10; w, 27-37. Port Republic, k, 13; w, 154; m, 32==199. Second Brigade, Col. J. A. Campbell (w), Col. John M. Patton: 21st Va., Col. John M. Patton, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham; 42d Va., Maj. Henry Lane (w), Capt. John E. Penn, Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Captain Samuel Hale (w), Maj. J. B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Garnett; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh, Maj. John Seddon. Brigade loss: Winchester, k, 2; w, 14 == 16. Cross Keys and Port Republic, k, 4; w, 16 == 20. Third Brigade, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson, Brig.-Gen. William B. Taliaferro: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Col. A. G. Taliaferro, Lieut.-Col. George W. Curtis; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams, Col. Samuel V. Fulkerson. Brigade loss
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
onald; 5th Va., Col. William S. T. Baylor; 27th Va., Col. A. J. Grigsby (w), Capt. G. C. Smith; 33d Va., Col. John F. Neff; Va. Battery (Alleghany Arty.), Lieut. John C. Carpenter; Va. Battery (Rockbridge Arty.), Capt. William T. Poague. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 149 == 179. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Brig.-Gen. J. R. Jones (w), Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr.: 21st Va., Maj. John B. Moseley, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Cunningham, Jr., Maj. John B. Moseley; 42d Va., Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 48th Va., Capt. John M. Vermillion; 1st Va. (Irish) Battalion, Capt. B. W. Leigh; Va. Batty. (Hampden Arty.), Capt. William H. Caskie. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 15 == 16. Third Brigade, Col. S. V. Fulkerson (mu w), Col. E. T. H. Warren, Brig.-Gen. Wade Hampton: 10th Va., Col. E. T. H. Warren; 23d Va., Capt. A. V. Scott; 37th Va., Maj. T. V. Williams; Va. Battery (Danville Arty.), Capt. George W. Wooding. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 15; m, 1==18. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander R. L
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
Perry; 28th Miss., Maj. J. T. McBee, Col. P. B. Starke; Ballentine's Miss., Capt. E. E. Porter, Lieut.-Col. W. C. Maxwell; A, 1st Confed. (Escort), Capt. James Ruffin. Ross's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. L. S. Ross; 1st Tex. Legion, Col. E. R. Hawkins; 3d Tex., Lieut.-Col. J. S. Boggess; 6th Tex., Lieut.-Col. Peter F. Ross; 9th Tex., Col. D. W. Jones, Capt. H. C. Dial. Ferguson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. S. W. Ferguson, Col. W. Boyles: 2d Ala., Col. John N. Carpenter; 56th Ala., Col. W. Boyles, Lieut.-Col. William Martin; 9th Miss., Col. H. H. Miller; 11th Miss., Col. R. O. Perrin; 12th Miss. Batt'n, Col. W. M. Inge, Capt. G. F. Peek. Artillery, Capt. John Waties: Ga. Battery, Capt. Ed. Croft, Lieut. A. J. Young; Mo. Battery, Capt. Houston King; S. C. Battery, Lieut. R. B. Waddell. first division Georgia militia, Maj.-Gen. Gustavus W. Smith (who has supplied the following paragraph): First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. W. Carswell: 1st Regt., Col. E. H. Pottle; 2d Regt., Col. C. D. Anderson: 5th Reg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
ed Sweeny, to Lay's Ferry, a point below Resaca. Under the chief engineer, Captain Reese, he laid a bridge and protected it by a small force. Sweeny, being threatened by some Confederates crossing the river above him, and fearing that he might be cut off from the army, suddenly drew back about a mile beyond danger. On the 15th, however, he made another attempt and was more successful; formed a bridge-head beyond the river; threw over his whole force; and fought a successful battle against Martin's Confederate cavalry, before Walker's infantry, which was hastily sent against him from Calhoun, could arrive. Besides Sweeny's division, Sherman dispatched a cavalry force over the pontoons, instructing them to make a wider detour. The operations in this quarter being successful, there was nothing left to the Confederate commander but to withdraw his whole army from Resaca. This was effected during the night of the 15th, while our weary men were sound asleep. At the first peep of dawn
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
the river with about six hundred men and four pieces of cannon, the latter under the respective commands of Captain Tompkins of the Rhode Island Battery, and Lieutenant Martin of the Ninth New York Battery. The remainder of Geary's force consisted of four companies of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania and three of the Third Wisconsee fierce charges of Ashby's cavalry, and withstood the storm of bullets from a long line of infantry on Bolivar Heights, until joined, at eleven o'clock, by Lieutenant Martin, with one rifled cannon, with which he had crossed the Potomac Ferry under a galling fire of riflemen on Loudon Heights. These two companies of the Twenty-eighth Pennsylvania turned the Confederate left near the Potomac, and gained a portion of the Heights. At the same time, Martin opened a telling fire on the Confederate cannon in front, and Tompkins silenced two guns on Loudon Heights. The main body moved forward at this crisis, charged the foe, and in a few minutes were in posse
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
n Davis, Charles Kenyon, Jeremiah Regan, Alexander Hood, John Kelley, Daniel Lakin, John Williams, John Breese, Alfred Patterson, Thomas C. Barton, Edwin Smith, Daniel Harrington, John Williams, J. B. Frisbee, Thomas Bourne, William McKnight, William Martin, John Greene, John McGowan, Amos Bradley, George Hollat, Charles Florence, William young, William Parker, Edward Wright, Charles Bradley, Timothy Sullivan, James Byrnes, John McDonald, Charles Robinson, Pierre Leno, Peter Colton, Charles W. Morton, William Martin, Robert Williams, George Bell, William Thompson, John Williams, Matthew Arthur, John MacKIEie, Matthew McClelland, Joseph E. Vantine, John Rush, John Hickman, Robert Anderson, Peter Howard, Andrew Brinn, P. R. Vaughn, Samuel woods, Henry Thielberg, Robert B. Wood, Robert Jordan, Thomas W. Hamilton, Frank Bois, Thomas Jenkins, Martin McHugh, Thomas E. Corcoran, Henry Dow, John Woon, Christ. Brennen, Edward Ringgold, James K. L. Duncan, Hugh Melloy, William P. Johnson, Bartl
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
whose will was law in the Confederacy, on hearing of this, directed Bragg, his favorite, to take permanent command of that army, and he passionately declared that Beauregard should not be reinstated, though all the world should urge him to the measure. Notes of an interview of a Congressional Committee with Davis, who requested the restoration of Beauregard, cited by General Jordan, in Harper's Magazine, XXXI., 616. While Beauregard was at Bladen, he wrote a letter to the Confederate General Martin, in which he expressed a coincidence of opinion with Stonewall Jackson, that the time had come for raising the black flag — in other words, giving no quarter — but killing every foe, armed or disarmed, in battle. I believe, he said, it is the only thing that will prevent recruiting at the North. --See The Weekly Register, Lynchburg, Virginia, April 16, 1864. This was a fortunate circumstance for the National cause. Although the possession of Corinth was of great military importance,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 16: the Army of the Potomac before Richmond. (search)
place of Henry Clay. While moving with a part of his brigade The Second Maine, the Twenty-fifth and a portion of the Forty-fourth New York, and a section of Martin's battery. toward Hanover Court-House, after this exploit, Martindale was attacked by a superior force that came up by railway from Richmond. He maintained his gh cheers that thrilled with joy the fainting hearts of the Unionists. Behind them the shattered brigades were speedily formed, while the batteries of Griffin and Martin poured a destructive storm of shot and shell upon the head of Lee's column. Seeing fresh troops on their front, and ignorant of their number, the Confederates fes in that vicinity. He placed his carriage and four horses at our disposal for several days; and we had competent guides as well as most genial companions in Colonels Martin, Graves, and Sullivan, of General Terry's Staff, who had participated in the stirring military events between Old Point Comfort and Richmond. Our first tri
s of the road by which we had come, advancing under shelter of the timber. The Forty-fourth New-York Col. Stryker, were here ordered into position on the left of Martin's battery, which was supported on the right by the Second Maine. The Twenty-fifth regiment was also sent for, it having halted at Dr. Kinney's house, the localiten the Forty-fourth New-York, Eighty-third Pennsylvania, Twelfth New-York, and Sixteenth Michigan. Here the Forty-fourth New-York was detached with two pieces of Martin's Fifth Massachusetts battery to guard against any attempt of the enemy to interfere with our rear. The regiments closed up, took the right-hand road, and forwar the Potomac. Meantime the Forty-fourth New-York, when the enemy made his appearance a second time for the purpose named, had been ordered up with a section of Martin's battery, and soon found itself subjected to a cross-fire from a much superior force. Clearly the enemy thought his work easy. A fragment of the Twenty-fifth
1 2 3 4 5 6