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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George R. Martin or search for George R. Martin in all documents.

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nd Acting Assistant-Surgeon George P. Wright came on board, for which we owe him our thanks. At the time that our boiler was exploded, five of our wounded went on board the Galena; four subsequently returned — the other was suffering much pain, and remained on board until transferred to the Metacomet. The safety of the ship after the explosion depended upon the Galena. That we are here quietly at anchor attests how nobly Lieutenant Commander Clark H. Wells stood by us. Assistant Paymaster George R. Martin assisted the Surgeon materially. He also superintended putting out a fire that broke out in the cabin. Paymaster's Clerk W. P. Treadwell rendered great service in passing orders to the bell, until he was required below to assist in caring for the wounded. He was quite badly scalded himself. Mr. George A. Ebbetts, Captain's Clerk, behaved splendidly. He was knocked down at the same time that Captain Mullany was wounded. Whenever he could be spared from below after this ac
. It was about three o'clock when the head of the column neared the station. A heavy line of skirmishers and sharp-shooters was thrown out to cover the advance of our batteries. There is a commanding position to the rear of the forts, and here Martin's and the First reserve artillery of heavy guns got into position and opened on the foe. Just before dark the storming parties — Russell's and Upton's brigades, led by General Russell in person — were formed. The Fifth corps were now advancing ory was formerly Griffin's and afterward Hazlett's,) made some splendid shooting. On a hill running to the right of the storming party, from which hill the enemy's skirmishers were driven by Howe's skirmishers of the Second division, were planted Martin's and Waterman's batteries, and four twenty-pound Parrott guns from the reserve artillery, The rebels say that the shells from all these guns were dropped directly over their works, and were thrown with more precision than they ever before witnes
, near the house of a Mr. Bell, one of our men was found hanging by the neck suspended to the limb of a tree, with a paper pinioned upon his breast. The paper contained in pencil the following: Milon Ferguson, One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio regiment, sent into our lines by Colonel Byrd in disguise. Hung as a spy, by order of--------. General Carter sent and had the soldier brought to town and decently interred. The neighbors, who were accused of the hanging, say it was done by rebel General Martin's escort. The following is General Burnside's congratulatory order to the army: headquarters army of the Ohio, in the field, December 5, 1863. General field orders, No. 34. The Commanding General congratulates the troops on the raising of the siege. With unsurpassed fortitude and patient watchfulness they have sustained the wearing duties of the defence, and with unyielding courage they have repulsed the most desperate assaults. The army of the Ohio has nobly guarded
ur artillery was on the eve of being lost. What few men were left to man the guns were doing all they could to get them away. Again the order was, Fix bayonets! and in the next instant, led by the gallant Colonel, we charged them at the point of the bayonet. With unbroken line, at double-quick, we went at them and drove them out of the woods across the open field. This was the first suspicion that rebel infantry were in the woods, as we afterward learned from a printed address of Major-General Martin, who commanded the enemy's forces--two divisions under Wheeler and Armstrong. The First Tennessee cavalry lost several in killed and wounded. The Twenty-fourth Indiana battery suffered most severely, nearly every man and horse belonging to it, being injured to a greater or less extent. The First Lieutenant and one private had their heads entirely blown off. The One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio escaped with but forty-two killed and wounded, out of four hundred and forty-one engaged
enth Indiana infantry, under Colonel Jackson. Our forces crossed the Clynch in good order, and there ended the contest. The enemy, according to reports of citizens and prisoners, consisted of five brigades of cavalry and mounted infantry, under command of Major-General Martino. The enemy intended to surround and capture Colonel Graham's command, but was foiled in his purpose. The enemy's loss was admitted to be twenty-five killed, about fifty wounded, and twenty-eight prisoners. Major-General Martin was wounded in the wrist; Colonel Deboel, commanding brigade, was seriously, if not mortally, wounded; his adjutant-general was killed; and Captain----, who led the charge, was also killed. Colonel Graham speaks in the highest terms of the unflinching courage and steadiness of his officers and men. Our loss is stated as follows: Sixty-fifth Indiana mounted infantry, two killed and six wounded; Fifth Indiana cavalry, five men killed, two officers and ten men wounded, and ten missin