Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. G. Martin or search for J. G. Martin in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
proudly To freedom or—the grave. J. C. H. Charlottesville, October 5th, 1864. Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. By Captain William L. Ritter. Paper no. 5. On the 7th of May the battery was ordered to the front on the line in Crow's Valley, and when, on the 8th, the enemy moved up as if to attack the Confederate works, they were received with so vigorous a fire that they rapidly withdrew. But two men of the Third Maryland were wounded: Privates N. M. Beverly and J. G. Martin. Again, on the 9th the enemy charged our works, but were repulsed with no loss to the battery. For three days there was only picket-firing along the whole line. The battle at Resaca. On the night of the 12th the corps fell back to Resaca. Two days later the battery took position on the front, two miles from Resaca, to the left of the Dalton road, and about a hundred yards to the right of an obtuse angle in the line, which was occupied by Dent's Alabama battery. The latter held
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. By Captain William L. Ritter. Paper no. 5. On the 7th of May the battery was ordered to the front on the line in Crow's Valley, and when, on the 8th, the enemy moved up as if to attack the Confederate works, they were received with so vigorous a fire that they rapidly withdrew. But two men of the Third Maryland were wounded: Privates N. M. Beverly and J. G. Martin. Again, on the 9th the enemy charged our works, but were repulsed with no loss to the battery. For three days there was only picket-firing along the whole line. The battle at Resaca. On the night of the 12th the corps fell back to Resaca. Two days later the battery took position on the front, two miles from Resaca, to the left of the Dalton road, and about a hundred yards to the right of an obtuse angle in the line, which was occupied by Dent's Alabama battery. The latter held the summit of a ridge, the prolongation of which, in front, it was expected to com
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
had seen his thirtieth year, and died like a true soldier, in defence of principles dear to himself, and which he firmly believed were of inestimable value to those who might come after him. In the long absence of years, he never once forgot the ties of home and kindred, but often expressed a wish to see his wife and children at his Maryland home, again to enjoy tranquility and peace. The losses of the Third Maryland at Nashville were four killed, eight wounded, and sixteen captured, exclusive of Lieutenant Giles and Private Colter, captured two days before the battle. Killed: Captain John B. Rowan, Privates S. Aultman, E. R. Roach and A. Wills. Wounded: A. Dollar, D. Beasley, N. Beverly, W. J. Brown, T. Early, H. A. Davis, E. M. Herndon and J. Nichols. Captured: Corporals A. G. Cox, S. Hylton and B. Bradford; Privates J. M. Carey, J. J. Colter, J. Foley, B. Garst, J. Hoffman, H. Kitzmiller, J. G. Martin, F. M. Newton, W. Rogers, G. R. Shipley, M. L. Welsh and I. Zimmerman.