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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jordan H. Martin or search for Jordan H. Martin in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
hat order was that he, Whiting, was, with all his available forces on both sides the Appomattox, Martin's and Wise's Brigade, numbering in all about 5,000 men, to cross the Appomattox and take the roaer this order was received, another order from Beauregard, changing this, came, ordering (J. G.) Martin's and Wise's Brigades to be at Dunlop's, on the Richmond and Petersburg turnpike, before daybreay in barricade at the Walthall Railroad junction with the Petersburg Railroad and the turnpike. Martin's Brigade was on the right and Wise's on the left, crossing the turnpike on which the enemy had rom Ware Bottom Church on the James to the front of Cobb's on the Appomattox. The part borne by Martin's and Wise's Brigades upon the enemy in their front was without failure and a perfect success; 6t perfect tactician, Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Council, of the 36th, led the charge, supported by Martin, who was supported in a third line by the remaining portions of Wise's Brigade. The 600 carried
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
Hobson, Julius A. Hackett, James H. Harrison, Samuel J. Harvey, John B. Isaacs, Wm. B. Jinkins, Andrew James, Edwin T. Johnston, Andrew Lyons, William H. Leftwich, John H. McCance, Thomas W. McKeil, John W. Martin, Jordan H. Meredith, R. L. Mitchell, John (Irish patriot). Maury, Robert H. Montague, John H. Purcell, John Perkins, E. T. Paine, Robert A. Palmer, George S. Peachy, Dr. St. G. Quarles, Benj. M. Randolph, Joseph Went; William G. Paine, Vice-President; Isaac H. Walker, Secretary; and Surgeons, Drs. Cabell and Peachy. The living members. Of those now living may be mentioned: Messrs. R. S. Archer, John Enders, Andrew L. Ellett, Samuel J. Harrison, Jordan H. Martin, John H. Montague, Powhatan Weisiger, and Philip J. Wright. The propriety of recognizing the services of these gentlemen in some suitable way will, there is little doubt, be called to the attention of Lee Camp of Confederate Veterans at s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
rity of youth, presses upon the scene, while Wellington prays that he or night would come. Waterloo was won by the accident of a well-directed route. Malvern Hill was doubtless a drawn battle because the Quaker road was misunderstood. It was a fearful ordeal to pass from under the cover of the hills that fringed the Crew field, and face the enemy. I could easily give you examples of personal valor and heroism unsurpassed in war. Of many such, probably none exceeded the gallantry of Captain Martin, of the 53rd Virginia Infantry, Armistead's brigade. And Thomas Fletcher Harwood, of Co. K (Charles City Southern Guard), color-bearer in his regiment, who lost a leg there, and is today one of the many maimed survivors of that fight, has a record in the archives at Washington that will carry his name to the latest posterity. A century hence the Daughters of the Confederacy will be establishing their right to membership upon these records, as many of Virginia's fair daughters to-day ar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
body would see I was a gentleman and give me decent burial. A few days after I had been among the tadpoles, as above related, I went to the rear, towards the Appomattox, to bathe and wash my clothing. I found, I thought, a safe place, and deposited my studs on a stump, taking my shirt with me into the water. While busy in my laundry the Federals made an attack, and their balls fell so thick around me that I retreated, taking my clothing, regardless of my studs. My remembrance is that Captain Martin, of General Hagood's staff, was wounded in the same vicinity that day. So when I went North for my health in 1868, and passed through Petersburg, I stopped over to see the old battlefield and find my studs. I found the stump, but the studs were gone. The old forts were reversed. Instead of facing North they faced South. Some negro women and a man were hoeing corn on the site of the left fort. I asked them if that was a Yankee or Rebel fort? He Yankee fort, was the answer. I was