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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 2 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
John James Geer, Beyond the lines: A Yankee prisoner loose in Dixie 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Luther Martin or search for Luther Martin in all documents.

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sentation as liable to such insuperable objections, etc., etc. Mr. Pinckney [C. C., of South Carolina] considered the Fisheries and the Western Frontier as more burdensome to the United States than the slaves. He thought this could be demonstrated, if the occasion were a proper one. On the question on the motion to insert free before inhabitants, it was disagreed to; New Jersey alone voting in the affirmative.--Madison's Papers, vol. III., p. 1261. Tuesday, August 21st: Mr. Luther Martin [of Maryland] proposed to vary Article VII., Section 4, so as to allow a prohibition or tax on the importation of slaves. In the first place, as five slaves are to be counted as three freemen in the apportionment of representatives, such a clause would leave an encouragement to this traffic. In the second place, slaves weakened one part of the Union, which the other parts were bound to protect. The privilege of importing was therefore unreasonable. And in the third place, it was in
its second. Rhode Island followed in 1786; Maryland in 1789; Connecticut in 1790; Virginia in 1791; New Jersey in 1792. The discovery that such societies were at war with the Federal Constitution, or with the reciprocal duties of citizens of the several States, was not made till nearly forty years afterward. These Abolition Societies were largely composed of the most eminent as well as the worthiest citizens. Among them were, in Maryland, Samuel Chase, a signer of the Declaration, and Luther Martin, one of the framers of the Constitution; in Delaware, James A. Bayard, Father of one of her present U. S. Senators. afterward in Congress, and Caesar A. Rodney, who became Attorney-General. The Pennsylvania Society had Benjamin Franklin for its President, and Benjamin Rush for Secretary — both signers of the Declaration. This, Franklin, then 84 years of age, signed this memorial on the 3d of February, 1790, and died on the 17th of April following. among other such societies, memo
rland. 2. Wabash. 3. Minnesota. 4 and 5. Susquehanna and Monticello, during the afternoon of the bombardment. 6, 7, and 8. Steamers Pawnee, Harriet Lane, and Monticello, protecting the landing of troops. by the new Forts Hatteras and Clark, mounting five and ten guns respectively, with five more ready for mounting on the more important work; the whole defended by 700 Confederates, under Corn. S. Barron, late of the Federal Navy; the infantry consisting of the 7th North Carolina, Col. Martin. The forts were found far less formidable than they doubtless would have been a few weeks later. The bombardment was commenced at 10 A. M., of the 28th; Fort Hatteras replying, with signal industry, to little purpose; its gunners being evidently inexperienced and unskilled. Fort Clark had little or nothing to say; and was next morning found to have been already abandoned. The Sound being still open, a heavily laden transport reenforced Fort Hatteras during the night; but this did
on to attack, though the advantage in numbers, in position, and even in artillery, appears to have been decidedly on our side. They were, of course, easily and badly beaten; the Pennsylvanians fighting with cool intrepidity and entire confidence of success. Our aggregate loss was but 9 killed and 60 wounded--among the latter, Lieut.-Col. Kane, who led his men with signal gallantry. The Rebels lost, by their own account, 230; among them, Col. Forney, of the 10th Alabama, wounded, and Lieut. Col. Martin, killed. They left 25 horses dead on the field, with two caissons--one of them exploded,--running off their guns by hand; the 6th South Carolina, out of 315 present, losing 65--in part, by the fire of the 1st Kentucky (Rebel), which, mistaking them for Unionists, poured a murderous volley into them at forty yards' distance. It was a foolish affair on the part of Stuart, who was palpably misled by the gas-conade of Evans, with regard to his meeting and beating more than four to one at
solution in the House, 570. Cranch, Judge, signs an Abolition petition, 142. Crandall, prudence, persecuted for teaching colored children, 127. Crawford, Martin J., a Confederate Commissioner at Washington, 430 to 436. Crawford, Wm. H., of Ga., 91. Crittenden, J. J., of Ky., 308; pleads for Conciliation in the Senated at Booneville, Mo., 574. Marshall, Chief Justice, 106; 109; 110; 252. Marshall, Humphrey, of Ky., 539; 614 Marston, Col. Gilman, at Bull Run, 525. Martin, Luther, 44; 107. Maryland, 36; first Abolition Society in, 107; 142; withdraws from the Douglas Convention, 318; 849; population in 1860, 351; 461; 468; Butle the Administration, 561; moves provisos to thee Army Appropriation bill, etc., 561 ; 562; 615; 629. Van Buren, John, on Fugitive Slave Act, 213. Van Buren, Martin, influences causing his defeat in the Baltimore Convention of 1844, 69: supports the Tariff of 1828, 91: supplants Calhoun as Vice-President in 1832. 93; allusion