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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 20 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 1 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 8 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Martindale or search for Martindale in all documents.

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's lines, and very many amusing scenes occurred. At one time General Weitzel and his orderly got among the rebels, and the latter was captured. He called to Weitzel to save him, which was done by placing a pistol at the rebel's head and ordering him to yield his musket to the orderly, by whom lie was marched off. Tables of this kind were constantly turned. General Butler was out in the thick tempest of rifle-shells. One shot passed between him and Colonel Kensett, one of his aids. General Martindale's sword was struck by a shrapnel shot and indented greatly. While the fighting was going on toward Richmond, an attempt was made on the part of the enemy to attack in rear, by coming up from Petersburg. General Ames, of the Tenth corps, who commands in that direction, gallantly kept them at bay until the order was given to retire. Tenth Army corps, near City Point, Va., Friday Evening, May 20, 1864. There has been to-day a fierce and sanguinary battle on the spot which I mentio
king the rifle-pits. Here, however, he was swept by the fire from a redoubt in his front, and Martindale, who was ordered to his support, not having been able to effect his dispositions in time to do the right with the Sixth, had advanced in conjunction with it; but the left division, that of Martindale, who led the attack in heavy, deep columns, got disarranged, and was repulsed. General Smith made three different attacks to relieve Martindale, but his last supports did not get up in time to allow him to hold on. The effect of this repulse on the left of Smith had a disastrous effect upon tng the crests of hills, on several farms, two miles from Petersburg. In this engagement General Martindale's division of the Eighteenth corps, which suffered moderately in the action, held the righied the works in their front, which they now firmly hold. At nine o'clock two brigades of General Martindale's division, supported by Duncan's brigade, were advanced on the right, and carried the reb
nd more efficient staff officers never drew rein or sabre, viz.: Major William Russell, Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain M. A. Reno, First United States cavalry, Chief of Staff; Captain R. Ellis, Sixth Pennsylvania cavalry, Assistant Inspector-General; Captain George B. Sandford, First United States cavalry, Assistant Commissary Musters; Captain J. J. Coppinger, Fourteenth Infantry, United States Artillery, A. A. D. C.; Captain Bailey, First New York Lincoln cavalry, A. A. D. C.; Captain Martindale, First New York Lincoln cavalry, A. A. D. C.; Captain M. Berry, Twentieth Pennsylvania cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Wallace, Fifth Michigan cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Ellis, Sixth Pennsylvania cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Slater, First New York dragoons, amb. officer; First Lieutenant H. H. Goldsmith, Fifteenth New Jersey volunteer infantry, A. D. C. I take pleasure in expressing my sincere thanks to division commanders and their commands for the hear