Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Harriet Martineau or search for Harriet Martineau in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
enate. Mrs. Eames (nee Campbell), living in Washington most of the time while Sumner was in the Senate, died in 1890. He found also solace and good cheer in the congenial fellowship of men and women, distinguished for antislavery activities or sympathies, who gathered almost daily in the home of Dr. Bailey of the National Era. Hardly a foreigner of distinction ever came to Washington while Sumner was in the Senate without seeking him. At this session Jacob Bright came, commended by Harriet Martineau; Arthur h. Clough, by John Kenyon; Dr. Charles Eddy, fellow of Oxford, by Macready; but it was not till the next session that he welcomed Thackeray. Among old English friends who visited Washington in 1852 were Lord and Lady Wharncliffe, John Stuart Wortley, the second Lord Wharncliffe. accompanied by their daughter, since Lady Henry Scott. Lord Wharncliffe, after his return home in the spring of 1852, wrote Sumner long and friendly letters; and though highly conservative, was symp
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
orth at Holwood. He dined twice with Mr. Parkes at the Reform Club, but his friends were mostly absent from London. He then went north to attend the exhibition at Manchester, and to fulfil engagements for visits at Mr. Ashworth's at Bolton, Miss Martineau's at Ambleside, and Mr. Ingham's at South Shields. From Edinburgh he penetrated into the highlands of Scotland as far as Fort Augustus, in order to visit an old acquaintance, Edward Ellice, Sr., at Glenquoich. From this northern point he wr9. Again all day at the Exhibition. In the evening went to Ellenbeck, the seat of Mr. Cardwell, where I dined and passed the night. September 30. Stopped an hour at Preston; also an hour at Kendal; saw these towns; went on to Ambleside to Miss Martineau's, where I passed the night. October 1. Left Ambleside early; stopped at Brougham Hall for a couple of hours; resisted pressing invitation to stay to dinner and all night; went on to Carlisle. October 2. Drove out to Scaleby Hall (seven
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
Printed in Memoires de l'academie des Sciences Morales et Politiques, vol. XI. p. 33. at the Institute, receiving a complimentary ticket from Mignet, the lecturer. Tender messages came across the channel from the Wharncliffes, Roebuck, Harriet Martineau, Parkes, Senior, the Duchess of Argyll, and Ingham,—all sympathetic in his suffering, and urging visits as soon as his progress to health admitted. He went some days to the galleries of the Louvre; but his best resource during the few hou the same occasion to make my first acquaintance with your friend Mr. Forster, for whose roof, I believe, you left Mine, or vice versa, when you were last in England. I was much struck with his straightforward grasp of mind. I went to see Harriet Martineau in the autumn, chiefly because you told me to do so. . . . In only one respect have I to find fault with your letter, and that must be very gravely,— you do not vouchsafe one syllable about the state of your own health, which is what above
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
not thinking it a bit too strong. The duchess reported Tennyson as warmly approving it, and saying, I thought the most eloquent thing in the speech was the unspoken thing,—the silence about his own story. Punch gave it a hearty assent, and Miss Martineau in public letters expressed her cordial sympathy with its scope and spirit. Miss Martineau's letters appeared in the New York Antislavery Standard. As the agitation went on in the summer and autumn,—the profoundest and most universal iMiss Martineau's letters appeared in the New York Antislavery Standard. As the agitation went on in the summer and autumn,—the profoundest and most universal in our history,—the people of the free States, it was found, were feeling and thinking as Sumner thought and felt; and the discussion broadened beyond the precise point in issue,—the extension of slavery into the Territories,—and embraced the character and history of slavery and the supremacy of the slave-power in the national government. It came to pass that Sumner's speech was read beyond that of any other statesman; and the call for his voice in different States was most urgent, even fro