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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: Maryland in its Origin, progress, and Eventual relations to the Confederate movement. (search)
reat dignity and authority. One was killed at the battle of the Severn, between the Cavaliers and Roundheads, in 1654, and his widow received a grant of land and was treated with great distinction by the proprietary. But the controlling force of the colony was the spirit of Baltimore, who in his instructions to his governors insisted that there should be no broils about religion or politics. Every man should be secured in the right to his opinion. Free thought was guaranteed to every Marylander, and free speech as well, except so far as free speech infringed on the rights of his neighbors, when it was strictly suppressed. Therefore, in the very foundation of Maryland was deeply laid the idea of toleration of different opinions among neighbors, of consideration for their feelings, and, as a logical consequence, of readiness at all times to help them, to protect them, and to assist them in all the struggles of life. There never was a more homogeneous, sentimental society than th
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
ou. I shall return this order to General Jackson with the endorsement, The First Maryland refuses to face the enemy, for I will not trust the honor of the glorious old State to discontented, dissatisfied men. I won't lead men who have no heart. Every man who is discontented must fall out of ranks—step to the rear and march with the guard. If I can get ten good men, I'll take the Maryland colors with them and will stand for home and honor; but never again call yourselves Marylanders! No Marylander ever threw down his arms and deserted his colors in the presence of the enemy—and those arms and those colors given you by a woman! Go! This appeal settled it. The men in ranks cheered and yelled, Forward, we'll show you! The men under guard pleaded with tears to be allowed to return to duty, ran back miles to the wagons, got their guns and rejoined their regiment by the time it attacked at Front Royal. The Marylanders marched forward, rejuvenated, reinvigorated, restored! The army ha
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
the South by the strongest social, political and commercial ties. They have seen with profound indignation their sister State deprived of every right, and reduced to the position of a conquered province. Under the pretense of supporting the Constitution, but in violation of its most valuable provisions, your citizens have been arrested and imprisoned upon no charge and contrary to all forms of law. The faithful and manly protest against this outrage made by the venerable and illustrious Marylander, to whom in better days no citizen appealed for right in vain, was treated with scorn and contempt. The government of your chief city has been usurped by armed strangers: your legislature has been dissolved by the unlawful arrest of its members: freedom of the press and of speech has been suppressed: words have been declared offense by an arbitrary decree of the Federal executive, and citizens ordered to be tried by a military commission for what they may dare to speak. Believing that
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
s touching and well-deserved tribute: It will be seen that our success was obtained at the sacrifice of many a brave officer and soldier. Chief among them was Brig.-Gen. Henry Little, commanding the first division of the army. Than this brave Marylander no one could have fallen more dear to me, or whose memory should be more fondly cherished by his countrymen. No more skillful officer or more devout patriot has drawn his sword in this war of independence. He died in the day of his greatest u. Smith and Howell Cobb in the surrender of Macon, Ga. General Mackall died August 12, 1891. Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson Brigadier-General Bradley T. Johnson, as commander of the Maryland Line, became most prominently the representative Marylander in the South. Ardent in his devotion to the cause, intelligent in his performance of duty, with a courage that was fearless as was his gallantry conspicuous, he attained a reputation throughout the service, and won repeated commendatio