Your search returned 80 results in 24 document sections:

1 2 3
exan Government had undoubted evidence. Ibid., vol. II,, p. 251, This secret league against the Texans seems to have existed at least as early as 1835, and to have continued unbroken, The United States Government received information from Colonel Mason, at Fort Leavenworth, in July, 1838, confirmed by General Gaines, that the Cherokees were arranging for a council of all the tribes on the frontier, preparatory to striking a simultaneous blow upon the settlements of Arkansas and Missouri, fres to observe peace by severely punishing its infraction. This decisive treatment led to a short but bloody struggle with the Comanches, ending in their severe chastisement and in comparative security to the harassed frontier. In May, 1839, Charles Mason, Assistant Secretary of War, writing to General Johnston, says: Colonel Karnes gives a deplorable account of the west; and I believe thinks, of the two, the marauding parties of the Americans are worse than the Mexicans or Indians. This, of
ead of Stuart's column arrested the movement of the opponents, attracted their fire, and finally caused their withdrawal, for which Jackson, in his report, made grateful acknowledgment. During the summer and fall, the cavalry occupied and held Mason's and Munson's hills and picketed as far as Falls Church and at points along the Potomac. With the exception of an affair at Lewinsville, in September, the period was uneventful and free from striking incidents. In September, 1861, Stuart was ch rifles and double-barreled shot-guns, with hardly a saber or a revolver. While McClellan was drilling his army in Washington and metamorphosing it from an armed mob into an efficient fighting machine, the Confederate horsemen occupied and held Mason's and Munson's Hill and picketed at points along the Potomac. With the exception of an affair at Lewinsville in September there was little actual fighting. In that month Stuart was commissioned brigadier-general, and in December occurred the ba
afayette C. Baker, in command of this cavalry, reported an encounter with Mosby, to whose depredations their organization was chiefly due, on October 22, 1863: Sir: This morning about ten o'clock a detachment of my battalion, under command of Major E. J. Conger, and a detachment of the California battalion, under command of Captain Eigenbrodt, encountered a squad of Mosby's men some three miles this side of Fairfax Court House and near the Little River turnpike. One of Mosby's men (named Charles Mason) was shot and instantly killed. The celebrated guerrillas, Jack Barns, Ed. Stratton, and Bill Harover, were captured and forwarded to the Old Capitol Prison. These men state that they were looking for Government horses and sutlers' wagons. None of our force were injured. Colonel Baker was in the Federal Secret Service, and used these cavalrymen as his police. Eight additional companies were subsequently organized for the First District of Columbia Cavalry at Augusta, Maine, January
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason and Dixon's line, (search)
Mason and Dixon's line, The disputed boundary-line between the State of Pennsylvania and the States of Maryland and Virginia—the border-line between the free and the slave States—fixed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English mathematicians and surveyors employed for the purpose, between 1763 and 1767. In the debates on slavery before the admission of Missouri, John Randolph used the words Mason and Dixon's line as figurative of the division between the two systems of labor. The presnd Virginia—the border-line between the free and the slave States—fixed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English mathematicians and surveyors employed for the purpose, between 1763 and 1767. In the debates on slavery before the admission of Missouri, John Randolph used the words Mason and Dixon's line as figurative of the division between the two systems of labor. The press and the politicians echoed it; and in that connection it was used until the destruction of slavery by the Ci
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason and Slidell affair. (search)
Mason and Slidell affair. See Trent, the; Mason, James Murray. Massachusetts, State of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
1682 [Dispute not settled until 1760, when it was referred to two English mathematicians, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, who ran the boundary-line due west 244 miles (1763-67) in lat. 39° 43′ 2While debating in Congress the Missouri Compromise, in 1820, John Randolph introduced the phrase Mason and Dixon's line, as separating freedom from slavery, or the North from the South; the phrase be Connecticut colony in the Wyoming Valley driven out by the Indians......Oct. 15, 1763 Surveyors Mason and Dixon begin running the southern boundary-line (see this record, 1682)......Dec. 9, 176s, issued......July 29, 1786 Boundary-line between Pennsylvania and Virginia, continuation of Mason and Dixon's line, extended to a point five degrees west from the Delaware......1786 Conventio, 1846 State forbids the use of jails to hold fugitive slaves......May 3, 1848 Resurvey of Mason and Dixon's line completed......Nov. 19, 1849 Judiciary made elective......1850 Manufactur
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays, chapter 4 (search)
onally knew more than at least the tutors of his time was one which never troubled me. Two of the four tutors, Bowen and Lovering, were men eminent as scholars from youth to old age; the third, Jones Very, was a man of genius; and the fourth, Charles Mason,--now Judge Mason, of Fitchburg,--certainly knew incomparably more of Latin than I did. Of the older professors, Felton was a cultivated Greek scholar, and Beck brought to Latin the thoroughness of his German drill. I need not say what it waJudge Mason, of Fitchburg,--certainly knew incomparably more of Latin than I did. Of the older professors, Felton was a cultivated Greek scholar, and Beck brought to Latin the thoroughness of his German drill. I need not say what it was to read French with Longfellow; and it is pleasant to remember that once — during one of those preposterous little rebellions which then occurred every two or three years, and which have wholly disappeared under a freer discipline — when the students were gathered in the college yard, and had refused to listen to several professors, there was a hush when Longfellow appeared, and my classmate, John Revere, cried out, We will hear Professor Longfellow, for he always treats us like gentlemen.
opposite to Windsor Street, and d. 5 May 1831; his w. Sarah d. 27 June 1863, a. 81. 14. Phineas Brown, s. of Thomas (9), m. Sarah Stone of Newton, and had in Watertown Sally, b. 10 Ap. 1795, m. Samuel Foster of Greenwich 19 Nov. 1817, and d. 10 Dec. 1819; Eunice, b. 31 May 1797, m. Isaac Livermore of Camb. (pub. 5 Oct. 1822), and d. 11 June 1871; Elizabeth Brown, b. 17 Mar. 1799; and in Cambridge Phineas Brown, b. 3 Sept. 1803, m. Mary L. Cooke 10 Nov. 1828; Caroline, b. 14 Ap. 1807; Charles Mason, b. 26 Oct. 1810, m. Ann Maria Chapouil 25 Dec. 1835; Josiah Dana, b. 31 Mar. 1813, m. Atlantic Peirce 27 Dec. 1835. Phineas Brown the f. was a grocer and resided at the N. W. corner of Brookline and Green streets, on an estate purchased 14 Oct. 1799. He erected a store on the northerly end of the lot, fronting Main Street, which is still standing and is occupied by his youngest son. The elder sons are extensively known as horticulturists. Mr. Hovey d. 19 Ap. 1852, a. 81; his w. Sarah
opposite to Windsor Street, and d. 5 May 1831; his w. Sarah d. 27 June 1863, a. 81. 14. Phineas Brown, s. of Thomas (9), m. Sarah Stone of Newton, and had in Watertown Sally, b. 10 Ap. 1795, m. Samuel Foster of Greenwich 19 Nov. 1817, and d. 10 Dec. 1819; Eunice, b. 31 May 1797, m. Isaac Livermore of Camb. (pub. 5 Oct. 1822), and d. 11 June 1871; Elizabeth Brown, b. 17 Mar. 1799; and in Cambridge Phineas Brown, b. 3 Sept. 1803, m. Mary L. Cooke 10 Nov. 1828; Caroline, b. 14 Ap. 1807; Charles Mason, b. 26 Oct. 1810, m. Ann Maria Chapouil 25 Dec. 1835; Josiah Dana, b. 31 Mar. 1813, m. Atlantic Peirce 27 Dec. 1835. Phineas Brown the f. was a grocer and resided at the N. W. corner of Brookline and Green streets, on an estate purchased 14 Oct. 1799. He erected a store on the northerly end of the lot, fronting Main Street, which is still standing and is occupied by his youngest son. The elder sons are extensively known as horticulturists. Mr. Hovey d. 19 Ap. 1852, a. 81; his w. Sarah
ct. 5, 1864. Mason, Adoniram J. First Lieutenant, 35th Mass. Infantry, Jan. 28, 1864. Captain, Nov. 29, 1864. Transferred to 29th Mass. Infantry, June 9, 1865. Mustered out, July 29, 1865. Mason, Albert. Second Lieutenant, 35th Mass. Infantry, July 29, 1862. Transferred to 38th Mass. Infantry, Aug. 18, 1862. First Lieutenant, Nov. 1, 1862. Commissioned Captain, July 16, 1863; declined. Captain, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. Volunteers, Apr. 7, 1864. See U. S. Army. Mason, Charles. Second Lieutenant, 38th Mass. Infantry, Feb. 27, 1863. First Lieutenant, May 27, 1864; not mustered. Brevet First Lieutenant and Captain, U. S. Volunteers, Mar. 13, 1865. Mustered out, June 30, 1865, as Second Lieutenant. Mason, Edward Bromfield. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 14th Mass. Infantry (afterward 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery), Mar. 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant, 2d Mass. Cavalry, June 4, 1863. Died at Readville, Mass., Sept. 14, 1863, of injuries received from an
1 2 3