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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 24: the called session of Congress.--foreign relations.--benevolent organizations.--the opposing armies. (search)
rs, Dr. Eliab Ward, Chris. Powell, Captain W. S. Mason, Charles S. Clampitt, Leopold M. J. Lemmens, D. L. Flanagan, Richard Sharp, Charles H. Kingston, Robert R. Corson, Samuel B. Fales, James Carroll, John T. Wilson. Committee of Ladies.--Mrs. Mary Grover, Mrs. Hannah Smith, Mrs. Priscilla Grover, Miss Sarah Holland, Mrs. Margaret Boyer, Mrs. Eliza J. Smith, Mrs. Anna Elkinton, Mrs. Ellen B. Barrows, Mrs. Mary L. Field, Mrs. Ellen J. Lowry, Mrs. Martha V. R. Ward, Mrs. Eliza Plumer, Mrs. Emily Mason, Mrs. Mary Green, Miss Catharine Baily, Mrs. Eliza Helmbold, Miss Amanda Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth Horton, Mrs. Sarah Femington, Mrs. Kate B. Anderson, Miss Anna Grover, Miss Martha B. Krider, Miss Annie Field, Miss Mary Grover, Mrs. Mary E. Cassedy. They worked in harmony and generous rivalry, all through the period of the war, in doing good. Both saloons were enlarged as necessity required, and both had temporary hospitals attached to them. To the immortal honor of the citizens of Philade
Secretary, Robt. R. Corson. Committee of Gentlemen.--Arad Barrows, Bazilla S. Brown, Joseph B. Wade, Isaac B. Smith, Sr., Erasmus W. Cooper, Job T. Williams, John W. Hicks, George Flomerfelt, John Krider, Sr., Isaac B. Smith, Jr., Charles B. Grieves, James McGlathery, John B. Smith, Curtis Myers, Dr. Eliab Ward, Chris. Powell, Capt. W. S. Mason, Charles S. Clampitt, Leopold M. J. Lemmens, D. L. Flanagan, Richard Sharp, Chs. H. Kingston, Robert R. Corson. Committee of Ladies.--Mrs. Mary Grover, Mrs. Hannah Smith, Mrs. Priscilla Grover, Miss Sarah Holland, Mrs. Margaret Boyer, Mrs. Eliza J. Smith, Mrs. Anna Elkinton, Mrs. Ellen B. Barrows, Mrs. Mary L. Field, Mrs. Ellen J. Lowry, Mrs. Martha V. R. Ward, Mrs. Eliza Plumer, Mrs. Emily Mason, Mrs. Mary Green, Miss Catharine Baily, Mrs. Eliza Helmbold, Miss Amanda Lee, Mrs. Elizabeth Horton, Mrs. Sarah Femington, Mrs. Kate B. Anderson, Miss Anna Grover, Miss Martha B. Krider, Miss Annie Field, Miss Mary Grover, Mrs. Mary A. Cassedy.
ation controlling the women nurses as in the North, but there was seldom any lack of feminine attention in the permanent hospitals. The greater part of the service was rendered entirely without remuneration, and, if paid for, the amount was trifling. The women of the South considered it a privilege to act as nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hos
ation controlling the women nurses as in the North, but there was seldom any lack of feminine attention in the permanent hospitals. The greater part of the service was rendered entirely without remuneration, and, if paid for, the amount was trifling. The women of the South considered it a privilege to act as nurses and hospital attendants. So many were they and such valuable services did they render, that it is almost an injustice to mention the few and omit the names of hundreds. Miss Emily Mason, niece of James M. Mason, Confederate commissioner to England, was the matron of one of the divisions of the Winder Hospital, while Miss Mary L. Pettigrew, sister of General Pettigrew, served in the same capacity, first at Raleigh, and then at Chimborazo. Mrs. Archibald Cary did effective service at Winder, where she was assisted by her daughter, later Mrs. Burton N. Harrison. The daughters of General Lee, Mrs. G. W. Randolph, and many others were frequent visitors to the Richmond hos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
-then a beardless boy serving in the Forty-ninth Virginia regiment--which was so graphic that I will publish it so soon as I can obtain a copy. A similar scene was enacted on the same day near the bloody angle, where General Lee was only prevented from leading Harris' Mississippi brigade into the thickest of that terrible fight by the positive refusal of the men to go forward unless their beloved Chieftain would go to the rear. These three incidents are all well authenticated; but Miss Emily Mason, in her biography, gives a correspondence between Hon. John Thompson Mason and General Lee, in which the fomer details the incident as it occurred with Gregg's Texas brigade, and asks the General about it. The reply is characteristic, and is as follows: Lexington, Va., December 7, 1865. Hon. John Thompson Mason: My Dear Sir — I regret that my occupations are such as to prevent me from writing at present a narrative of the event which you request in your letter of the 4th instan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
ackson; Colonel Charles C. Jones' Siege of Savannah, Chatham artillery, Life of Commodore Tatnall, &c.; General Basil W. Duke's History of Morgan's cavalry ; General Jordan's Forrest and his campaigns, Admiral Semmes' Service Afloat; Boykin's Life of Howell Cobb; Handy's United States Bonds; Stevenson's Southern side of Andersonville; Brevier's First and Second Confederate Missouri brigades; Hodge's First Kentucky brigade; Wilkinson's Blockade Runner; Alfriend's Life of Jefferson Davis; Miss Emily Mason's Popular life of General R. E. Lee; Hotchkiss and Allan's Chancellorsville with their superb maps; General J. A. Early's Memoirs of the last year of the War; Miss Mary Magill's Women, or Chronicles of the War, and her History of Virginia; and a number of other similar books. If another had written them we should have added to the list, Jones' Reminiscences, anecdotes and letters of General R. E. Lee, and the Army of Northern Virginia Memorial volume, but we, of course, would not vio
II., 324, 336; VII., 169; Second home brigade, II., 348; Third home brigade, II., 324; Sixth, II., 336. Cavalry: First, II., 328, 348. Maryland the invasion of: II., 58 seq., 240; campaign of, II., 78; feeling against the United States troops passing through, VIII., 74; enlistment on both sides, VIII., 103; campaign, Lee's, VIII., 154, 159. Maryland Heights, Va.: II., 60; the abandoned stronghold, II., 325; III., 326. Mason, A. P., VI., 291. Mason, C., IV., 329. Mason, Emily Vii., 296. Mason, H. R., V., 205. Mason, J. M.: I., 354; VI., 310, 314.; VII., 296. Mason, J. S., VII., 150. Mason, J. W., IV., 212. Mason, R.: VII., 10; VIII., 10. Mason and Dixon line Ii., 78, 234. Mason and Munson's Hill, Va., IV., 79. Massachusetts troops: Artillery, Heavy: First, III., 65; at Belle Plain, Va., V., 52, 53; Third, X., 101; Company K, X., 101; Company A, V., 105. Artillery, Light: First, I., 362; battery in camp, V., 27;