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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason, Stevens Thomson 1760- (search)
Mason, Stevens Thomson 1760- Legislator; born in Stafford county, Va., 1760; was educated at the College of William and Mary, and at the age of twenty years held the rank of colonel in the Virginia troops. At the close of the Revolution he was a brigadier-general. In the Virginia House of Representatives he was conspicuous; also in the convention in Virginia in 1788 to consider the national Constitution. He took a conspicuous place in the Democratic party (see Jay, John), and was United e age of twenty years held the rank of colonel in the Virginia troops. At the close of the Revolution he was a brigadier-general. In the Virginia House of Representatives he was conspicuous; also in the convention in Virginia in 1788 to consider the national Constitution. He took a conspicuous place in the Democratic party (see Jay, John), and was United States Senator from 1794 until his death in Philadelphia, Pa., May 10, 1803. Mr. Mason was distinguished for oratory, and was very popular.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason and Dixon's line, (search)
Mason and Dixon's line, The disputed boundary-line between the State of Pennsylvania and the States of Maryland and Virginia—the border-line between the free and the slave States—fixed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English mathematicians and surveyors employed for the purpose, between 1763 and 1767. In the debates on slavery before the admission of Missouri, John Randolph used the words Mason and Dixon's line as figurative of the division between the two systems of labor. The press and the politicians echoed it; and in that connection it was used until the destruction of slavery by the Civil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Virginia, (search)
bert C. Walker1869 to 1874 James L. Kemper1874 to 1878 F. W. M. Holliday1878 to 1882 W. E. Cameron1882 to 1886 Fitz-Hugh Lee1886 to 1890 Philip W. McKinney1890 to 1894 Charles T. O'Ferrall1894 to 1898 J. Hoge Tyler1898 to 1902 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Richard Henry Lee1st to 2d1789 to 1792 William Grayson1st1789 to 1790 John Walker1st1790 James Monroe1st to 4th1790 to 1795 John Taylor2d to 3d1792 to 1794 Henry Tazewell3d to 5th1794 to 1799 Stevens Thomson Mason4th to 8th1795 to 1803 Wilson Cary Nicholas6th to 8th1800 to 1804 Andrew Moore8th to 11th1804 to 1809 William B. Giles8th to 14th1814 to 1815 John Taylor8th1808 Abraham B. Venable8th1803 to 1804 Richard Brent11th to 13th1809 to 1814 James Barbour13th to 19th1815 to 1825 Armistead T. Mason14th1816 to 1817 John W. Eppes15th1817 to 1819 James Pleasants16th to 17th1819 to 1822 John Taylor17th to 18th1822 to 1824 Littleton W. Tazewell18th to 22d1824 to 1832 John Randolph19th t